Afghan National Security Forces

Latest Afghan National Security Forces Items
  • Illiteracy plagues Afghan forces despite $200M Uncle Sam tutoring program

    A $200 million program to teach Afghanistan troops how to read is still leaving almost half of all security forces illiterate, a new report found.


  • Afghan National Army soldiers march in the Sangin district of Kandahar province in southern Afghanistan on Thursday, June 13, 2013. One of the most significant turning points in one of America's longest and costliest wars is imminent: Afghanistan's fledgling security forces are taking the lead for security nationwide, bringing the moment of truth on the question of whether they are ready to fight an insurgency that remains resilient after nearly 12 years of conflict. That question is especially pressing here in this border region, where insurgents regularly ambush government forces and control parts of the countryside. (AP Photo/Allauddin Khan)

    Afghans poised to take security lead from U.S., NATO

    One of the most significant turning points in one of America's longest and costliest wars is imminent: Afghanistan's fledgling security forces are taking the lead for security nationwide, bringing the moment of truth on the question of whether they are ready to fight an insurgency that remains resilient after nearly 12 years of conflict.


  • The iconic "Poo Pond," a waste retention pond at the Kandahar Air Field known for its odor, was slated to close mid-2013. However, the pond, shown here in this May 17, 2013, photo, will remain open until the airfield's residents no longer need a place to discard waste, including that from portable toilets. (Kristina Wong/The Washington Times)

    Coalition troops are ready to 'rough it' while closing Afghan bases

    Troops stationed at bases in Afghanistan enjoy some of the comforts of home: living quarters, bathroom facilities, cooked meals, even laundry and mail services.


  • Members of U.S. Marine Scout-Sniper team look for a Taliban position in a nearby tree-line, during an exchange of fire with Taliban militants, in Helmand province, southern Afghanistan, Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Threat from within: U.S. military braced for surge in Taliban ‘insider’ attacks

    Taliban insurgents recently vowed to carry out new “infiltration” attacks aimed at killing and demoralizing U.S., allied, and Afghan military forces as part of the spring military offensive, according to U.S. officials.


  • **FILE** Afghan National Army Lt. Col. Abdul Wakil Warzajy (left), battalion commander, gives orders to soldiers of the First Battalion before they set out on a search and capture mission towards the village of Noor Khiel village, Logar province, eastern Afghanistan. (Associated Press)

    Afghan Army 'marginally' capable of taking over after U.S. leaves, review finds

    The Afghan military is "marginally" capable of repelling attacks from the Islamist extremists who antagonize large parts of the country, according to an internal Pentagon assessment that raises red flags for President Obama's plan to withdraw the majority of US troops next year.


  • Afghan Army 'marginally' capable of taking over after US leaves, review finds

    The Afghan military is "marginally" capable of repelling attacks from the Islamist extremists who antagonize large parts of the country, according to an internal Pentagon assessment that raises red flags for President Obama's plan to withdraw the majority of US troops next year.


  • U.S. commandos hand over strategic base to Afghan forces

    U.S. special operations forces handed over their base in a strategic district of eastern Afghanistan to local Afghan special forces on Saturday, senior U.S. commanders said. The withdrawal satisfies a demand by Afghan President Hamid Karzai that U.S. forces leave the area after allegations that the Americans' Afghan counterparts committed human rights abuses there on U.S. orders.


  • Karzai edict prompted by reports

    Afghan President Hamid Karzai is calling for all U.S. special operations forces to stop all activity in Wardak province in eastern Afghanistan immediately and leave entirely in two weeks after reports that the troops are "harassing, annoying, torturing and even murdering innocent people," according to an official statement.


  • **FILE** Afghan National Army Lt. Col. Abdul Wakil Warzajy (left), battalion commander, gives orders to soldiers of the First Battalion before they set out on a search and capture mission towards the village of Noor Khiel village, Logar province, eastern Afghanistan. (Associated Press)

    Afghan attacks on allies alarm departing nations

    Western nations preparing to withdraw from combat in Afghanistan increasingly are alarmed by Afghan security forces turning their weapons on allied troops, attacks that the Taliban claim as proof of their sway over local troops.


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