Topic - Afghanistan

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  • News briefs from around Kentucky at 1:59 a.m. EDT

    The original "Band of Brothers" has a new commander and will be getting a new home.

  • This undated image provided by the U.S. Army shows Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. The nearly five-year effort to free the only American soldier held captive in Afghanistan is scattered among numerous federal agencies with a loosely organized group of people working on it mostly part time, according to two members of Congress and military officials involved in the effort. An ever-shrinking U.S. military presence in Afghanistan has re-focused attention on efforts to bring home Bergdahl, who has been held by the Taliban since June 30, 2009.   (AP Photo/U.S. Army)

    Taliban ready to deal on captive US soldier?

    The captors of an American soldier held for nearly five years in Afghanistan have signaled a willingness to release him but are unclear which U.S. government officials have the authority to make a deal, according to two individuals in the military working for his release. Critics of the release effort blame disorganization and poor communication among the numerous federal agencies involved.

  • U.S. Army Specialist Kyle White, right, shakes hands with North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory, left, after talking about his role during an ambush on his platoon in eastern Afghanistan that earned him the Medal of Honor during a news conference in Charlotte, N.C., Wednesday, April 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

    Medal of Honor nominee recounts deadly attack

    For U.S. Army Sergeant Kyle White, the firefight began without warning.

  • Navy Cross bestowed on heroic Marine

    A Marine gunnery sergeant who repeatedly braved Taliban fire to rescue and rally his troops in Afghanistan has received the Navy Cross.

  • FILE - This Nov. 7, 2013 file photo shows Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond Odierno testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington. In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, young men and women joined the military to fight through the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and the dusty deserts of Iraq. Less than 10 years later, many of these young officers are captains in the Army with multiple combat deployments under their belts. But now, as the wars wind down and Pentagon budgets shrink, many are being told they have to leave. The process is painful and frustrating. In quiet conversations across Fort Bragg, N.C., and at Fort Eustas in Virginia, captains talked about their frustrations and their fears. And they nervously wait as their fates rest in the hands of evaluation boards that may spend only a few minutes reading through each service record before making the decision that may end their careers.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Post-9/11 military build-up reversal hits officers

    After the 9/11 attacks, tens of thousands of young men and women joined the military, heading for the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and dusty deserts of Iraq.

  • US military deaths in Afghanistan at 2,177

    As of Tuesday, April 22, 2014, at least 2,177 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count.

  • Army leader suspended after insensitivity claims

    A Fort Carson commander who wasn't allowed to leave for Afghanistan with his troops last month was suspended over allegations that he was insensitive to victims of sexual assault and discrimination, a newspaper reported Tuesday.

  • FILE - This Nov. 7, 2013 file photo shows Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond Odierno testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington. In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, young men and women joined the military to fight through the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and the dusty deserts of Iraq. Less than 10 years later, many of these young officers are captains in the Army with multiple combat deployments under their belts. But now, as the wars wind down and Pentagon budgets shrink, many are being told they have to leave. The process is painful and frustrating. In quiet conversations across Fort Bragg, N.C., and at Fort Eustas in Virginia, captains talked about their frustrations and their fears. And they nervously wait as their fates rest in the hands of evaluation boards that may spend only a few minutes reading through each service record before making the decision that may end their careers.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    As Army shrinks, young officers being pushed out

    After the 9/11 attacks, tens of thousands of young men and women joined the military, heading for the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and dusty deserts of Iraq.

  • SIMMONS: Let us not forget to remember warriors in war on terror

    There is no single memorial to our members of U.S. forces who were killed serving in our war on terror.

  • FILE - This Nov. 7, 2013 file photo shows Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond Odierno testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington. In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, young men and women joined the military to fight through the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and the dusty deserts of Iraq. Less than 10 years later, many of these young officers are captains in the Army with multiple combat deployments under their belts. But now, as the wars wind down and Pentagon budgets shrink, many are being told they have to leave. The process is painful and frustrating. In quiet conversations across Fort Bragg, N.C., and at Fort Eustas in Virginia, captains talked about their frustrations and their fears. And they nervously wait as their fates rest in the hands of evaluation boards that may spend only a few minutes reading through each service record before making the decision that may end their careers.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    As Army shrinks, young officers being pushed out

    After the 9/11 attacks, tens of thousands of young men and women joined the military, heading for the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and dusty deserts of Iraq. Many of them now are officers in the Army with multiple combat deployments under their belts. But as the wars wind down and Pentagon budgets shrink, a lot of them are being told they have to leave.

  • Charles Daughaday of Myrtle Beach, S.C., is a veteran of World War II and the Korean War. He visits the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, another monument commemorating a conflict in American history. Veterans of Afghanistan and Iraq combat are hoping to see their own memorial eventually, but there is no end in sight to the war on terrorism. (Eva Russo/Special to The Washington Times)

    Building a D.C. memorial for an endless war bumps into regulations

    Veterans of the war on terrorism say they deserve a monument in downtown Washington to recognize their sacrifices, but they are hindered by a rule that says a conflict must be long finished in order to build a memorial, leading some to wonder how to commemorate a "never-ending war."

  • Dogs show Connecticut kids how to clear land mines

    The land mine was buried just a few yards from the children. But they could neither see nor smell it. One wrong step and ... BOOM!!!! ... a crippling, perhaps fatal, explosion could kill or maim.

  • Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., reacts to supporters as she campaigns for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., at an American Federation of Teachers Union rally in Cincinnati Friday, Oct. 31, 2008. (AP Photo/Tom Uhlman)

    USAID documents cite Hillary Clinton in chaos of Afghan aid

    Top officials at the U.S. Agency for International Development repeatedly cited former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton for setting into motion a policy to waive restrictions on who could receive U.S. aid in Afghanistan, resulting in millions of dollars in U.S. funds going directly into the corrupt Afghan ministries.

  • Fort Carson marks company's return without harm

    Despite firefights, bombs, mortar attacks and hundreds of missions to render explosives safe, Fort Carson's 663rd Ordnance Company came home March 31.

  • NY-based Texas soldier dies from combat wounds

    Military officials say a soldier from Texas based at Fort Drum in northern New York has died from injuries suffered in an attack in Afghanistan last weekend.

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