Afghanistan

Latest Afghanistan Items
    2_classroom_mugshot_four_by_three.jpg

    2_classroom_mugshot_four_by_three.jpg

    In this Thursday, July 5, 2012, photo, Afghan students are seen during passing their midyear school examinations at the Mirbachakot high school on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghanistan will seek at least $4 billion from international donors this weekend at a crucial aid conference aimed at propping up the country after most foreign combat troops leave at the end of 2014. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)


    12088400306_0cb97dd33e_o 2.jpg

    12088400306_0cb97dd33e_o 2.jpg

    Balkh Education Facility roof in Afghanistan. In the latest aid problem in Afghanistan, investigators found that a school built for the Balkh province is still unfinished, with structural issues that could pose a danger to students and teachers. “Nearly 5 years after construction began, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is unable to transfer the facility to Afghan authorities,†said the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. The school needs repairs to “a leaking roof, defective electrical wiring, and an improperly sloped terrace roof,†inspectors said, adding that sewer pipes near water sources aren't properly insulated, raising the possibility of contamination. They're also concerned about whether the roof and septic system are designed to hold the weight imposed on them, and that officials cannot assure that the structure “will not collapse at some point in time.†USAID disagreed that the building is structurally unsound. The Army Corps of Engineers which built the school, has “rigorous procedures and requirements for the design and construction of its building projects.†The aid agency did agree that work on the school is incomplete, and said they will fix any remaining problems with the building. The school has yet to be approved for use, but classes were held in the building in 2013. In response, USAID secured the facility to make sure no one used it, but SIGAR noted that Afghan authorities are not pleased about the ongoing delays. The original contract to build the school was just under $3 million, part of a $17.1 million program to build a system of educational facilities across Afghanistan.


    12088394896_808d82602a_o 2.jpg

    12088394896_808d82602a_o 2.jpg

    Balkh Education Facility 3 in Afghanistan. In the latest aid problem in Afghanistan, investigators found that a school built for the Balkh province is still unfinished, with structural issues that could pose a danger to students and teachers. “Nearly 5 years after construction began, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is unable to transfer the facility to Afghan authorities,†said the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. The school needs repairs to “a leaking roof, defective electrical wiring, and an improperly sloped terrace roof,†inspectors said, adding that sewer pipes near water sources aren't properly insulated, raising the possibility of contamination. They're also concerned about whether the roof and septic system are designed to hold the weight imposed on them, and that officials cannot assure that the structure “will not collapse at some point in time.†USAID disagreed that the building is structurally unsound. The Army Corps of Engineers which built the school, has “rigorous procedures and requirements for the design and construction of its building projects.†The aid agency did agree that work on the school is incomplete, and said they will fix any remaining problems with the building. The school has yet to be approved for use, but classes were held in the building in 2013. In response, USAID secured the facility to make sure no one used it, but SIGAR noted that Afghan authorities are not pleased about the ongoing delays. The original contract to build the school was just under $3 million, part of a $17.1 million program to build a system of educational facilities across Afghanistan.


    12088092244_19c1ae5bcb_o 2.jpg

    12088092244_19c1ae5bcb_o 2.jpg

    Balkh Education Facility 2 in Afghanistan. In the latest aid problem in Afghanistan, investigators found that a school built for the Balkh province is still unfinished, with structural issues that could pose a danger to students and teachers. “Nearly 5 years after construction began, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is unable to transfer the facility to Afghan authorities,†said the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. The school needs repairs to “a leaking roof, defective electrical wiring, and an improperly sloped terrace roof,†inspectors said, adding that sewer pipes near water sources aren't properly insulated, raising the possibility of contamination. They're also concerned about whether the roof and septic system are designed to hold the weight imposed on them, and that officials cannot assure that the structure “will not collapse at some point in time.†USAID disagreed that the building is structurally unsound. The Army Corps of Engineers which built the school, has “rigorous procedures and requirements for the design and construction of its building projects.†The aid agency did agree that work on the school is incomplete, and said they will fix any remaining problems with the building. The school has yet to be approved for use, but classes were held in the building in 2013. In response, USAID secured the facility to make sure no one used it, but SIGAR noted that Afghan authorities are not pleased about the ongoing delays. The original contract to build the school was just under $3 million, part of a $17.1 million program to build a system of educational facilities across Afghanistan.


    12088049893_94b6c8f8e5_o 2.jpg

    12088049893_94b6c8f8e5_o 2.jpg

    Access point to septic tank at the Balkh Education Facility in Afghanistan. In the latest aid problem in Afghanistan, investigators found that a school built for the Balkh province is still unfinished, with structural issues that could pose a danger to students and teachers. “Nearly 5 years after construction began, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is unable to transfer the facility to Afghan authorities,†said the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. The school needs repairs to “a leaking roof, defective electrical wiring, and an improperly sloped terrace roof,†inspectors said, adding that sewer pipes near water sources aren't properly insulated, raising the possibility of contamination. They're also concerned about whether the roof and septic system are designed to hold the weight imposed on them, and that officials cannot assure that the structure “will not collapse at some point in time.†USAID disagreed that the building is structurally unsound. The Army Corps of Engineers which built the school, has “rigorous procedures and requirements for the design and construction of its building projects.†The aid agency did agree that work on the school is incomplete, and said they will fix any remaining problems with the building. The school has yet to be approved for use, but classes were held in the building in 2013. In response, USAID secured the facility to make sure no one used it, but SIGAR noted that Afghan authorities are not pleased about the ongoing delays. The original contract to build the school was just under $3 million, part of a $17.1 million program to build a system of educational facilities across Afghanistan.


    12088034783_ace74acdb2_o 2.jpg

    12088034783_ace74acdb2_o 2.jpg

    Balkh Education Facility in Afghanistan. In the latest aid problem in Afghanistan, investigators found that a school built for the Balkh province is still unfinished, with structural issues that could pose a danger to students and teachers. “Nearly 5 years after construction began, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is unable to transfer the facility to Afghan authorities,†said the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. The school needs repairs to “a leaking roof, defective electrical wiring, and an improperly sloped terrace roof,†inspectors said, adding that sewer pipes near water sources aren't properly insulated, raising the possibility of contamination. They're also concerned about whether the roof and septic system are designed to hold the weight imposed on them, and that officials cannot assure that the structure “will not collapse at some point in time.†USAID disagreed that the building is structurally unsound. The Army Corps of Engineers which built the school, has “rigorous procedures and requirements for the design and construction of its building projects.†The aid agency did agree that work on the school is incomplete, and said they will fix any remaining problems with the building. The school has yet to be approved for use, but classes were held in the building in 2013. In response, USAID secured the facility to make sure no one used it, but SIGAR noted that Afghan authorities are not pleased about the ongoing delays. The original contract to build the school was just under $3 million, part of a $17.1 million program to build a system of educational facilities across Afghanistan.


    12088030443_c6a3408014_o 2.jpg

    12088030443_c6a3408014_o 2.jpg

    Balkh Education Facility classroom in Afghanistan. In the latest aid problem in Afghanistan, investigators found that a school built for the Balkh province is still unfinished, with structural issues that could pose a danger to students and teachers. “Nearly 5 years after construction began, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is unable to transfer the facility to Afghan authorities,†said the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. The school needs repairs to “a leaking roof, defective electrical wiring, and an improperly sloped terrace roof,†inspectors said, adding that sewer pipes near water sources aren't properly insulated, raising the possibility of contamination. They're also concerned about whether the roof and septic system are designed to hold the weight imposed on them, and that officials cannot assure that the structure “will not collapse at some point in time.†USAID disagreed that the building is structurally unsound. The Army Corps of Engineers which built the school, has “rigorous procedures and requirements for the design and construction of its building projects.†The aid agency did agree that work on the school is incomplete, and said they will fix any remaining problems with the building. The school has yet to be approved for use, but classes were held in the building in 2013. In response, USAID secured the facility to make sure no one used it, but SIGAR noted that Afghan authorities are not pleased about the ongoing delays. The original contract to build the school was just under $3 million, part of a $17.1 million program to build a system of educational facilities across Afghanistan.


    12088027783_4dec1ab9e1_o 2.jpg

    12088027783_4dec1ab9e1_o 2.jpg

    Paint peeling off classroom ceiling of the Balkh Education Facility in Afghanistan. In the latest aid problem in Afghanistan, investigators found that a school built for the Balkh province is still unfinished, with structural issues that could pose a danger to students and teachers. “Nearly 5 years after construction began, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is unable to transfer the facility to Afghan authorities,†said the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. The school needs repairs to “a leaking roof, defective electrical wiring, and an improperly sloped terrace roof,†inspectors said, adding that sewer pipes near water sources aren't properly insulated, raising the possibility of contamination. They're also concerned about whether the roof and septic system are designed to hold the weight imposed on them, and that officials cannot assure that the structure “will not collapse at some point in time.†USAID disagreed that the building is structurally unsound. The Army Corps of Engineers which built the school, has “rigorous procedures and requirements for the design and construction of its building projects.†The aid agency did agree that work on the school is incomplete, and said they will fix any remaining problems with the building. The school has yet to be approved for use, but classes were held in the building in 2013. In response, USAID secured the facility to make sure no one used it, but SIGAR noted that Afghan authorities are not pleased about the ongoing delays. The original contract to build the school was just under $3 million, part of a $17.1 million program to build a system of educational facilities across Afghanistan.



Happening Now