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FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2016 file photo, visitors to the American Museum of Natural History examine a replica of a 122-foot-long dinosaur on display at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. An Explorer app at the American Museum of Natural History uses hundreds of Bluetooth hotspots to navigate visitors around its vast labyrinth of halls to artifacts that interest them most. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

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In this Oct. 28, 2006, file photo, then-Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., speaks at a benefit gala for the Clinton Foundation at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow, File)

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Students work on exercises as part of a 15-month master’s program in teaching at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, Friday, Feb. 14, 2014. The program is the only freestanding graduate program at a museum in the U.S. Students are on a paid fellowship but must commit to teaching earth science at a high-needs public school for at least four years after they graduate. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

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Visitors to the American Museum of Natural History in New York inspect a detailed model of a 60-foot-long Mamenchisaurus at "The World's Largest Dinosaurs'" exhibit. The exhibition explored the biology of the long-necked and long-tailed sauropods. A new study in the journal Current Biology suggests that sauropods produced enough methane, through burps and flatulence, that it helped keep an already warm Earth warmer. (Associated Press)

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20120507-190904-pic-211343207.jpg

Visitors to the American Museum of Natural History in New York inspect a detailed model of a 60-foot-long Mamenchisaurus at "The World's Largest Dinosaurs'" exhibit. The exhibition explored the biology of the long-necked and long-tailed sauropods. A new study in the journal Current Biology suggests that sauropods produced enough methane, through burps and flatulence, that it helped keep an already warm Earth warmer. (Associated Press)