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In this Oct. 28, 2006, file photo, then-Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., speaks at a benefit gala for the Clinton Foundation at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow, File)

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Students work on exercises as part of a 15-month master’s program in teaching at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, Friday, Feb. 14, 2014. The program is the only freestanding graduate program at a museum in the U.S. Students are on a paid fellowship but must commit to teaching earth science at a high-needs public school for at least four years after they graduate. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

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Visitors to the American Museum of Natural History in New York inspect a detailed model of a 60-foot-long Mamenchisaurus at "The World's Largest Dinosaurs'" exhibit. The exhibition explored the biology of the long-necked and long-tailed sauropods. A new study in the journal Current Biology suggests that sauropods produced enough methane, through burps and flatulence, that it helped keep an already warm Earth warmer. (Associated Press)

20120507-190904-pic-211343207.jpg

20120507-190904-pic-211343207.jpg

Visitors to the American Museum of Natural History in New York inspect a detailed model of a 60-foot-long Mamenchisaurus at "The World's Largest Dinosaurs'" exhibit. The exhibition explored the biology of the long-necked and long-tailed sauropods. A new study in the journal Current Biology suggests that sauropods produced enough methane, through burps and flatulence, that it helped keep an already warm Earth warmer. (Associated Press)