Anders Behring Breivik

Latest Anders Behring Breivik Items
  • The front page of the Norwegian newspaper VG published on Sunday, Aug. 14, 2011, shows Anders Behring Breivik as he is taken back to Utoya island by police the day before for a reconstruction of the July 22 terror attacks that killed 69 people. (AP Photo/Kyrre Lien, Scanpix Norway)

    Norway suspect reconstructs shootings on island

    The chilling images of Anders Behring Breivik simulating shots into the water at the island where he killed 69 people at a youth camp were broadcast around the world Sunday after police took him back there.


  • Anders Behring Breivik sits in an armored police vehicle after leaving the courthouse following a hearing in Oslo, Norway where he pleaded not guilty to one of the deadliest modern mass killings in peacetime. It's unlikely that Breivik will be declared legally insane because he appears to have been in control of his actions, the head of the panel that will review his psychiatric evaluation told The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Aftenposten/Jon-Are Berg-Jacobsen) NORWAY OUT

    Massacre changes Norway's thinking on personal liberty

    If a man walks into a drug store along one of this city's winding streets and buys three boxes of aspirin, there would be no reason to take notice.


  • Norway's Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg, center left, background, attends the funeral of Mona Abdinur in Oslo, Norway, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2011. Abdinur was killed in the July 22 shooting attack at Utoya island. (AP Photo/Photo Berit Roald/Scanpix Norway)

    Norway massacre forces new look at security in Europe

    If a man walked into a drug store along one of this city's winding streets and bought three boxes of aspirin, there would be no reason to take notice. But when Anders Behring Breivik visited 20 drug stores a day for four days and bought three packages of aspirin at each stop — then separately ordered six tons of fertilizer, chemicals and a semiautomatic rifle — he still largely escaped attention.


  • Illustration: Anders Behring Breivik

    FIELDS: The evil mind of the mass murderer

    Nothing so focuses the mind on the nature of evil like mass murder. The numbers magnify a singular horror and become collectively unfathomable. Josef Stalin, who knew something about mass murder, showed his cold-blooded ruthlessness when he called one death a tragedy, many deaths a statistic.


  • Fears raised about hate groups in British soccer

    The head of British soccer's anti-racism body warns that extremists are trying to infiltrate the game, citing the massacre in Norway as a wake-up call.


  • ** FILE ** Anders Behring Breivik, 32, in an image from his Twitter page, espoused his views against cultural Marxism and Islamism in a 12-minute English-language video that proposes a crusade and features him toting a machine gun. (Associated Press)

    Lawyer: Norwegian attacker makes demands

    The confessed killer in Norway's twin terror attacks that claimed 77 lives has presented a long list of "unrealistic" demands, including the resignation of the government and that his mental condition be investigated by Japanese specialists, his defense lawyer said Tuesday.


  • "We all have something to learn from the tragedy. We can all have a need to say 'I was wrong,' and be respected for it," said Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg. (Associated Press)

    Norway's prime minister urges leaders for restraint

    Norway's prime minister on Monday called on political leaders to show restraint in what they say as the country emerges from mourning the 77 victims of a bombing and youth-camp massacre by an anti-Muslim extremist.


  • ** FILE ** Anders Behring Breivik, 32, in an image from his Twitter page, espoused his views against cultural Marxism and Islamism in a 12-minute English-language video that proposes a crusade and features him toting a machine gun. (Associated Press)

    Insanity ruling not likely in Norway

    It's unlikely that the right-wing extremist who admitted killing dozens in Norway last week will be declared legally insane because he appears to have been in control of his actions, the head of the panel that will review his psychiatric evaluation told the Associated Press.


  • A woman is seen in front of wall decorated with flowers in memory of the victims of Friday's bomb attack and shooting rampage in Oslo, Norway, Tuesday, July 26, 2011. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

    Oslo massacre sparks multicultural debate in Europe

    Europeans are debating immigration and multiculturalism with new urgency after the massacre of 77 people in Oslo, victims of a mass murderer who says he wanted to ignite a crusade against Islam.


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