Topic - Andre Geim

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  • University of Manchester professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, right, awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics pose for pictures outside Manchester University, Manchester, England, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010. (AP Photo/Jon Super).

    2 in Britain win Nobel Prize in physics

    Two Russian-born scientists shared the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for "groundbreaking experiments" with the thinnest, strongest material known to mankind — a carbon vital for the creation of faster computers and transparent touch screens.

  • This undated image made available by the University of Manchester, England Tuesday Oct. 5, 2010 shows Russian-born scientist Andre Geim in Manchester, England. Russian-born scientists Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov shared the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday Oct. 5, 2010 for "groundbreaking experiments" with an atom-thin material expected to play a large role in electronics.   (AP Photo/University of Manchester, HO)

    2 professors in UK win Nobel Prize in physics

    Two Russian-born scientists shared the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for "groundbreaking experiments" with the thinnest, strongest material known to mankind _ a carbon vital for the creation of faster computers and transparent touch screens.

  • This undated image made available by the University of Manchester, England Tuesday Oct. 5, 2010 shows Russian-born scientist Andre Geim in Manchester, England. Russian-born scientists Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov shared the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday Oct. 5, 2010 for "groundbreaking experiments" with an atom-thin material expected to play a large role in electronics.   (AP Photo/University of Manchester, HO)

    Nobel physics prize for ultrathin carbon discovery

    Two Russian-born scientists shared the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for groundbreaking experiments with the strongest and thinnest material known to mankind _ a potential building block for faster computers and lighter airplanes and satellites.

  • Professor Andre Geim, right, is congratulated by a wellwisher outside Manchester University after being awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics along with colleague Dr Konstantin Novoselov, Manchester, England, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010. The scientists  shared the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for "groundbreaking experiments" with the thinnest, strongest material known to mankind  a carbon vital for the creation of faster computers and transparent touch screens. (AP Photo/Jon Super).

    Nobel Prize honors super-strong, super-thin carbon

    It is the thinnest and strongest material known to mankind _ no thicker than a single atom and 100 times tougher than steel. Could graphene be the next plastic? Maybe so, says one of two scientists who won a Nobel Prize on Tuesday for isolating and studying it.

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  • This undated image made available by the University of Manchester, England Tuesday Oct. 5, 2010, shows Russian-born scientist Andre Geim who shared the Nobel Prize in Physics announced Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010, with fellow Russian native Konstantin Novoselov for "groundbreaking experiments" with an atom-thin material expected to play a large role in electronics.

  • In a telephone interview with reporters in Stockholm, Geim said he was shocked by the announcement but planned to go to work as usual on Tuesday.

    2 professors in UK win Nobel Prize in physics →

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