Topic - Andrew Wakefield

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  • Actress and former Playboy playmate Jenny McCarthy was named Monday to join the panel of the ABC weekday talk show "The View." Co-host Barbara Walters made the widely expected announcement on the air. (Victoria Will/Invision/AP)

    EDITORIAL: An outbreak of common sense on vaccines

    The childhood scourge of measles is making a comeback. The highly contagious disease was all but eradicated in the United States more than a decade ago, but an outbreak in California has infected 50 persons so far this year.

  • Illustration by William Brown

    SCANLON: The war against vaccines

    As the proud grandfather of three beautiful grand- daughters, I have closely followed news stories about autism, a developmental disability in children that seems to have reached epidemic proportions in recent years. The claim that there is a connection between the vaccination of children and the onset of autism has troubled me, as it has my sons and their wives, the mothers of my grandkids - 7-year-old Riley, 5-year-old Kate, and Cameron, age 7 months.

  • In this photo made March 29, 2011, Hodan Hassan is shown at her Minneapolis home with her six-year-old daughter Geni who has autism. Health officials struggling to contain a measles outbreak that's hit hard in Minneapolis' large Somali community are running into resistance from parents who fear the vaccine could give their children autism. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

    Autism fears, measles spike among Minn. Somalis

    Health officials struggling to contain a measles outbreak that's hit hard in Minneapolis' large Somali community are running into resistance from parents who fear the vaccine could give their children autism.

  • Illustration: Politicized vaccine by Linas Garsys for The Washington Times

    GOLDBERG: Doctored truth, dead babies

    Tom and Patsy Morris wanted what was best for their son, Nikolas, who was facing a battery of critical immunizations. Like most parents, the Morrises relied on information from the Web to assess risks associated with vaccinating children. After being alarmed by Internet statements and news accounts like those based on Andrew Wakefield's false claim that vaccines cause autism, they decided against completing Nikolas' pertussis vaccination. A year later, he nearly died from whooping cough.

  • FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, Dr. Andrew Wakefield addresses a gathering hosted by the American Rally For Personal Rights in Chicago's Grant Park. A 1998 paper by Wakefield, which was the first study to link a childhood vaccine to autism, was based on doctored information about the children involved, according to a new report on the widely discredited research. The conclusions of the 1998 paper have been renounced by 10 of its 13 authors and was later retracted by the medical journal Lancet, where it was published. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogas, File)

    Will autism fraud report be a vaccine booster?

    This week more shame was heaped upon the discredited British researcher whose work gave rise to the childhood-vaccines-cause-autism movement, as a prominent medical journal published a report that the man had faked his data. But will it make a difference?

  • Journal: Study linking vaccine to autism was fraud

    The first study to link a childhood vaccine to autism was based on doctored information about the children involved, according to a new report on the widely discredited research.

  • "This is a ruthless, pragmatic attempt to crush any investigation into valid vaccine concerns," Dr. Andrew Wakefield said. (Associated Press)

    Journal: Study linking vaccine to autism was fraud

    The first study to link a childhood vaccine to autism was based on doctored information about the children involved, according to a new report on the widely discredited research.

  • "This is a ruthless, pragmatic attempt to crush any investigation into valid vaccine concerns," Dr. Andrew Wakefield said. (Associated Press)

    Journal calls study that linked autism to vaccines a 'fraud'

    A 1998 British study that launched an international fear that certain childhood vaccinations can cause autism has been labeled an "elaborate fraud" in a medical journal.

  • Journal: Study linking vaccine to autism was fraud

    The first study to link a childhood vaccine to autism was based on doctored information about the children involved, according to a new report on the widely discredited research.

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  • "This is a ruthless, pragmatic attempt to crush any investigation into valid vaccine concerns," Dr. Andrew Wakefield said.

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