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Andy Warhol

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This undated image provided by The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, Pa., shows "Venus", a piece that is thought to be made by the late pop artist, Andy Warhol, on a computer in 1985. The museum says that the artist had a contract with Commodore International to produce images on one of its Amiga home computers. The old images recently were extracted from disks by members of Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University Computer Club in collaboration with museum staff. (AP Photo/Andy Warhol, 1985, ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visuals Arts, Inc.)

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This undated image provided by The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, Pa., shows "Andy2", a piece that is thought to be made by the late pop artist, Andy Warhol, on a computer in 1985. The museum says that the artist had a contract with Commodore International to produce images on one of its Amiga home computers. The old images recently were extracted from disks by members of Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University Computer Club in collaboration with museum staff. (AP Photo/Andy Warhol, 1985, ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visuals Arts, Inc.)

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This undated image provided by The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, Pa., shows "Campbell’s," a piece that is thought to be made by the late pop artist, Andy Warhol, on a computer in 1985. The museum says that the artist had a contract with Commodore International to produce images on one of its Amiga home computers. The old images recently were extracted from disks by members of Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University Computer Club in collaboration with museum staff. (AP Photo/Andy Warhol, 1985, ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visuals Arts, Inc.)

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This April 1964 photo provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. shows a 20x20 foot mural depicting mug shots of the NYPD’s 13 most-wanted criminals by Andy Warhol, mounted on the curved facade of the New York State Pavilion at the 1964 New York World’s Fair in the Queens borough of New York. The fair celebrated “The World of Tomorrow,” but Warhol may have been ahead of his time. His monumental piece commissioned specifically for the fair was deemed too edgy for the family-friendly event and painted over just before opening day. Now, 50 years later, the work is the focus of a museum exhibition being staged on the very fairgrounds where the pop-art provocateur was infamously censored. (AP Photo/The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society)

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This April 1964 photo provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. shows a 20x20 foot mural depicting mug shots of the NYPD’s 13 most-wanted criminals by Andy Warhol, mounted on the curved facade of the New York State Pavilion at the 1964 New York World’s Fair in the Queens borough of New York. The fair celebrated “The World of Tomorrow,” but Warhol may have been ahead of his time. His monumental piece commissioned specifically for the fair was deemed too edgy for the family-friendly event and painted over just before opening day. Now, 50 years later, the work is the focus of a museum exhibition being staged on the very fairgrounds where the pop-art provocateur was infamously censored. (AP Photo/The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society)

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This undated handout image provided by the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery shows a portrait of Andy Warhol by Jamie Wyeth, part of an exhibit at the museum in Washington: “Face Value: Portraiture in the Age of Abstraction.” The new exhibit explores how Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Elaine de Kooning and other artists pushed the boundaries of portraiture in the mid-20th century. (AP Photo/Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery)

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This undated handout image provided by the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery shows a portrait of Marilyn Monroe by Willem de Kooning, part of an exhibit at the museum in Washington: “Face Value: Portraiture in the Age of Abstraction.” The new exhibit explores how Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Elaine de Kooning and other artists pushed the boundaries of portraiture in the mid-20th century. (AP Photo/Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery)

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This undated handout image provided by the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery shows a portrait of Jacqueline Kennedy by Andy Warhol, part of an exhibit at the museum in Washington: “Face Value: Portraiture in the Age of Abstraction.” The new exhibit explores how Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Elaine de Kooning and other artists pushed the boundaries of portraiture in the mid-20th century. (AP Photo/Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery)