Anthony Kennedy

Latest Anthony Kennedy Items
  • This undated photo made available by the Florida Department of Corrections shows inmate Freddie Lee Hall. Hall. The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that states must look beyond an intelligence test score in borderline cases of mental disability to determine whether a death row inmate is eligible to be executed. The justices said in a 5-4 decision that Florida and a handful of other states cannot rely solely on an IQ score above 70 to bar an inmate from claiming mental disability. Justice Anthony Kennedy said for the court that IQ tests have a margin of error, and those inmates whose scores fall within the margin must be allowed to present other evidence of mental disability. (AP Photo/Florida Department of Corrections, HO)

    Supreme Court rules for death-row inmates with low IQ

    Twelve years after barring execution of the mentally disabled, the Supreme Court on Tuesday prohibited states in borderline cases from relying only on intelligence test scores to determine whether a death row inmate is eligible to be executed.


  • FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2013, file photo, Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaks to faculty members at the University of Pennsylvania law school in Philadelphia. The pro-gay rights rulings of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy have been a key spark in the march toward legalized gay marriage. To counter the trend, same-sex marriage opponents now are seizing upon other opinions by Kennedy himself. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

    Same-sex marriage opponents invoke Justice Kennedy

    The pro-gay rights rulings of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy have been a key spark in the march toward legalized gay marriage. To counter the trend, same-sex marriage opponents now are seizing upon other opinions by Kennedy himself.


  • Justice Anthony Kennedy

    ISTOOK: Even prayer not safe from the courts, regulators

    Public prayer is a right of the American people, doubly-protected by free speech and free exercise of religion under our First Amendment. Sadly, our courts don't agree. And bureaucrats such as in the Veterans Administration don't seem to agree, either. They try to regulate it.


  • FILE - In this April 26, 2014 file photo, people walk on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court said Monday that prayers that open town council meetings do not violate the Constitution even if they routinely stress Christianity.   (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

    High court ruling favors prayer at council meeting

    A narrowly divided Supreme Court upheld decidedly Christian prayers at the start of local council meetings on Monday, declaring them in line with long national traditions though the country has grown more religiously diverse.


  • Supreme Court upholds freedom to pray at public meetings

    The U.S. Supreme Court on May 5 upheld the practice of voluntary prayer before public meetings by a 5-4 ruling, drawing praise from those who said such prayers are a long American tradition that avoids censoring religion.


  • Supreme Court endorsed legislative prayer for second time in 30 years

    The 5-4 Supreme Court decision Monday upholding prayers at local government meetings pleased supporters who cheered the second endorsement of "legislative prayers" in 30 years.


  • A Supreme Court visitor takes pictures with her cellphone outside the Supreme Court in Washington on April 29, 2014, during a hearing on whether police may search cellphones found on people they arrest without first getting a warrant. (Associated Press)

    Justices wary of unlimited cellphone searches

    The Supreme Court seemed wary Tuesday of allowing police unbridled freedom to search through cellphones of people they arrest, taking on a new issue of privacy in the face of rapidly changing technology.


  • FILE - This Oct. 13, 2013 file photo shows Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaking in Philadelphia. The Supreme Court on Wednesday said a federal law limits how much money victims of child pornography can recover from people who viewed their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the Internet. Kennedy said for the court that federal judges should exercise discretion in awarding restitution. The case involved a woman known in court papers by the pseudonym "Amy." Her losses have been pegged at nearly $3.4 million, based on the ongoing Internet trade and viewing of images of her being raped by her uncle when she was 8 and 9 years old.  (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

    High court nixes $3.4M award to child porn victim

    The Supreme Court on Wednesday rejected a plea to make it easier for victims of child pornography to collect money from people who view their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the Internet. Two dissenting justices said Congress should change the law to benefit victims.


  • Michigan affirmative ban is OK, Supreme Court says

    A state's voters are free to outlaw the use of race as a factor in college admissions, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday in a blow to affirmative action that also laid bare tensions among the justices about a continuing need for programs that address racial inequality in America.


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