Topic - Arthur Caplan

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  • FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2007 file picture, Edward Anthony, left, describes medical experiments that were performed on him while he was an inmate at Philadelphia's Holmesburg Prison, as author Allen Hornblum listens in Philadelphia. Anthony's recollections as a test subject during the mid-1960s, and of struggling with the physical and psychological troubles that followed, are the subjects of "Sentenced to Science," a book by Hornblum. (AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy, File)

    AP IMPACT: Ugly US medical experiments uncovered

    Shocking as it may seem, U.S. government doctors once thought it was fine to experiment on disabled people and prison inmates. Such experiments included giving hepatitis to mental patients in Connecticut, squirting a pandemic flu virus up the noses of prisoners in Maryland, and injecting cancer cells into chronically ill people at a New York hospital.

  • FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2007 file picture, Edward Anthony, left, describes medical experiments that were performed on him while he was an inmate at Philadelphia's Holmesburg Prison, as author Allen Hornblum listens in Philadelphia. Anthony's recollections as a test subject during the mid-1960s, and of struggling with the physical and psychological troubles that followed, are the subjects of "Sentenced to Science," a book by Hornblum. (AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy, File)

    AP IMPACT: Past medical testing on humans revealed

    Shocking as it may seem, U.S. government doctors once thought it was fine to experiment on disabled people and prison inmates. Such experiments included giving hepatitis to mental patients in Connecticut, squirting a pandemic flu virus up the noses of prisoners in Maryland, and injecting cancer cells into chronically ill people at a New York hospital.

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Quotations
  • "The government has invested in cutting edge bioscience to promote Japan's economy, so the revelation of fraud and misconduct at a major institute is both an embarrassment for the government and a huge setback for the Japanese research community," he said.

    Stem cell controversy sets back Japanese science →

  • Arthur Caplan, an expert on bioethics at New York University Langone Medical Center, said the doubts about the research are a "devastating blow" for Japanese science.

    Stem cell controversy sets back Japanese science →

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