Ban Ki-Moon

Latest Ban Ki-Moon Items
  • Israel, Turkey try to ease tensions before U.N. report

    Estranged allies Israel and Turkey are working to mend ties before the release of a U.N. report on Israel's deadly May 31, 2010, raid on a Turkish-flagged ship seeking to run its naval blockade of the Gaza Strip.


  • U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon won a unanimous vote of confidence Tuesday from the world body's General Assembly. (Associated Press)

    S. Korea's Ban gets second 5-year term as U.N. chief

    The United Nations General Assembly voted unanimously to give Ban Ki-moon a second term as secretary-general Tuesday, praising him for strengthening the world body's role and visibility in difficult circumstances.


  • A South Korean resident stands on the rubble of a destroyed house on Yeonpyeong island, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2010. South Korea found the burned bodies Wednesday of two islanders killed in a North Korean artillery attack, marking the first civilian deaths in the incident and dramatically escalating the tensions in the region's latest crisis. (AP Photo/Yonhap)

    South Korea reports 2 civilian deaths in clash with North

    Rescuers found the burned bodies Wednesday of two islanders killed in a North Korean artillery attack — the first civilian deaths from a skirmish that marked a dramatic escalation of tensions between the rival Koreas.


  • In this Sept. 13, 2010 photo, a malnourished Pakistani boy, who came from a camp for people displaced by floods, rests on his bed during a power outage at the Railway Hospital in Sukkur, Sindh province, southern Pakistan. Medical experts warn the real catastrophe is moving much slower than the floodwaters. Children already sick or weak in poor rural areas prior to the floods are now fighting to stay alive as diarrhea, respiratory diseases and malaria attack their emaciated bodies. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

    Kids without food in Pakistan floods face death

    Suhani Bunglani fans flies away from her two baby girls as one sleeps motionless while the other stares without blinking at the roof of their tent, her empty belly bulging beneath a green flowered shirt.


  • In this Sept. 13, 2010 photo, a malnourished Pakistani boy, who came from a camp for people displaced by floods, rests on his bed during a power outage at the Railway Hospital in Sukkur, Sindh province, southern Pakistan. Medical experts warn the real catastrophe is moving much slower than the floodwaters. Children already sick or weak in poor rural areas prior to the floods are now fighting to stay alive as diarrhea, respiratory diseases and malaria attack their emaciated bodies. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

    Kids without food in Pakistan floods face death

    Suhani Bunglani fans flies away from her two baby girls as one sleeps motionless while the other stares without blinking at the roof of their tent, her empty belly bulging beneath a green flowered shirt.


  • Sri Lanka hearings on civil war begin

    A government-appointed commission looking into Sri Lanka's civil war began public hearings Wednesday amid international skepticism about its credibility as it has no mandate to investigate allegations that thousands of civilians died in the final months of the conflict.


  • U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (right) visits a new house built by the U.N. Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA) for a Palestinian family whose house was destroyed during the Israeli offensive last year. (AP Photo/Mahmud Hams, Pool)

    BOLTON: Ban mischief at the U.N..

    United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is close to making an enormously significant misjudgment about his role and authority. Mr. Ban has repeatedly called for an "international" inquiry into the May 31 clash with Israeli commandos, provoked by supporters of Hamas on a Turkish-flagged ship off the Gaza Strip, resulting in nine killed and dozens wounded.


  • U.N. Report

    Dueling agendas


  • How Democrats 'support the troops'

    After yesterday's all-night Iraq war "defeatathon," as radio talk-show host Laura Ingraham described it, House and Senate Democrats continue to illustrate why Americans so distrust them when it comes to national security. Antiwar lawmakers have been losing momentum of late, to such an extent that U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon and representatives of liberal humanitarian organizations like the International Crisis Group found it necessary to warn that a precipitous troop withdrawal could trigger a humanitarian catastrophe for Iraqis. So yesterday, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid staged an overnight session where senators debated abandoning Iraq. Mr. Reid came up eight votes short in his effort to obtain cloture on an amendment to the defense authorization bill offered by Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl Levin and Sen. Jack Reed, which decreed that the secretary of defense shall "commence the reduction of the number of United States forces in Iraq not later than 120 days after the enactment of this act."


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