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Barry Goldwater

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Youngsters in signature Goldwater glasses carry beagles to greet Sen. Barry Goldwater during a campaign stop in Montgomery, Alabama. (associated press)

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National Edition News cover for November 18, 2014 - GOLDWATER’S GOLDEN - Conservatives celebrate 50 years of movement he ignited: Sen. Barry Goldwater accepts the Republican presidential nomination in San Francisco, July 16, 1964 with a blast at the Democrats and a promise that "together we will win" in the November election. (AP Photo)

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Barry Goldwater greets an Indianapolis crowd during a campaign tour in Oct. 1964. (AP Photo

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Sen. Barry Goldwater, then the GOP presidential nominee, and his vice presidential running mate, Rep. William E. Miller of New York, appear together on Capitol Hill, Aug. 14, 1964. In the fall election, the Conservative Party took the lead in promoting Goldwater after word went out that the state GOP was not to lift a finger for its presidential nominee. Although Goldwater lost New York by nearly 3 million votes on Election Day in 1964, he had a lasting impact on the state's fledgling conservative movement. (Associated Press)

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A demonstration for Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater (right) is held on the final night of the Republican National Convention in San Francisco on July 16, 1964. Goldwater lost his presidential bid to incumbent Lyndon B. Johnson, who ascended to the presidency in 1963 following President John F. Kennedy's assassination. (Associated Press)

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Former Sen. Barry Goldwater flew from his home in Arizona February 15, 1988 to endorse Vice President George H.W. Bush in the New Hampshire primary during a news conference in Nashua. Mr. Bush went on to defeat Democratic challenger Michael Dukakis and serve one term as president.

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Sen. Barry Goldwater rallied a new conservative generation during his presidential campaign in 1964. Although he lost that contest, his landmark philosophies of conservatism still echo a half-century later. As Goldwater's son, Barry Goldwater Jr., reminds us, conservatives must present positive answers to national problems, not just condemn them. (Associated Press)

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President Ronald Reagan, right, greets Sen. Barry Goldwater, R-Ariz., in the Rose Garden at the White House during a ceremony to start National Partiotism Week in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Feb. 17, 1981. (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)

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Sen. Barry Goldwater, Arizona Republican, announces his candidacy for the U.S. presidency in Phoenix on Jan. 3, 1964.

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Sen. Barry Goldwater accepts the Republican presidential nomination in San Francisco on July 16, 1964, with a blast at the Democrats and a promise that "together we will win" in the November election. (associated press photographs)

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Sen. Barry Goldwater greets an enthusiastic Indianapolis crowd in October 1964. As a sharp-tongued, uncompromising defender of conservatism, Goldwater began the philosophical reshaping of the Republican Party with his fierce but futile presidential campaign.

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Barry Goldwater, the GOP presidential candidate four years ago, waves to the delegates and spectator during his speech to this year's Republican National Convention in Miami Beach August 5, 1968. (AP Photo)

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Barry Goldwater waves to delegates inside the Cow Palace at the 1964 Republican National Convention in San Francisco. As a senator, he strongly argued that it is a core American value and in the country's best interest to stand by Taiwan as it faced an existential threat from tyrannical communists. Goldwater's contribution to the U.S.-Taiwan relationship made him a figure of enormous importance and won him profound respect on the other side of the Pacific. He championed the passage of the Taiwan Relations Act (TRA), a landmark piece of legislation, which through bipartisan support, was signed into law in April 1979. To this day, that law provides the bedrock for U.S.-Taiwan relations. (Associated Press)

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Shining moment: Barry Goldwater lost the presidential election 50 years ago, but he won the hearts of a new generation of conservatives. Many of those who have carried his torch will celebrate and remember at a dinner Tuesday in Washington. (Associated Press)

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Vice President Richard Nixon, left, is shown with Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizona in this July 27, 1960 photo. Goldwater, the sharp-tongued, defender of conservatism whose fierce but futile campaign for the presidency in 1964 began the philosophical reshaping of the Republican Party, died Friday, May 29, 1998. (AP Photo/file)

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Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater is seen, 1965. (AP Photo)

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From left, Barry Goldwater Jr., son, Bob Goldwater, brother, Peggy Clay, daughter, Joanne Goldwater, daughter and Susan Goldwater, widow of the late U.S. Senator Barry Goldwater place their hands on his casket Wednesday, June 3, 1998, as they resite the Lords Prayer during funeral services at Gammage auditorium at Arizona State University. (AP Photo/Jeff Robbins)

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The casket of former senator and presidential candidate Barry Goldwater is carried to Arizona State University's Gammage Auditorium Wednesday, June 3, 1998, in Tempe, Ariz. Goldwater died last Friday of natural causes at age 89. (AP Photo/Pool, Jeff Robbins)

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Former U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Barry Goldwater, left, meets with Senator and Republican presidential hopeful Bob Dole at Goldwater's Phoenix, Ariz., home Sunday afternoon, Feb. 25, 1996. Goldwater expressed his support for Dole's presidential candidacy. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

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Former Senator Barry Goldwater flew from his home in Arizona Monday, February 15, 1988 to endorse Vice President George Bush in the New Hampshire primary during a news conference in Nashua. (AP Photo/Jim Gerberich)