Topic - Bevacizumab

Bevacizumab is currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cancers that are metastatic (have spread to other parts of the body). It received its first approval in 2004 for combination use with standard chemotherapy for metastatic colon cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. who objected because it only slowed tumor growth but failed to extend survival. In the US, Members of a Food and Drug Administration panel said in July 2010 that they do not see enough of a benefit from Avastin in advanced breast cancer to justify its serious risks, although the drug is still approved for use in Australia. - Source: Wikipedia

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • Novartis tries to make UK hospitals use $1000 drug

    Drug maker Novartis is taking legal action in Britain to make state-run hospitals use an eye drug that costs about 700 pounds ($1,130) per shot instead of a cheaper one that costs 60 pounds ($97).

  • FDA finds more vials of fake cancer drug

    The Food and Drug Administration is warning doctors that a second counterfeit version of the best-selling cancer drug Avastin has been found in the U.S., packaged as the Turkish brand of the medication.

  • ** FILE ** The Food and Drug Administration has warned doctors that a second counterfeit version of the best-selling cancer drug Avastin has been found in the United States, packaged as Altuzan, the Turkish brand of the medication, which is not approved for use in the U.S. The agency said any packages or vials labeled with the lot number B6021 should be considered counterfeit. (AP Photo/U.S. Food and Drug Administration)

    FDA finds more fake medicine for cancer

    The Food and Drug Administration is warning doctors that a second counterfeit version of the best-selling cancer drug Avastin has been found in the U.S., packaged as the Turkish brand of the medication.

  • Illustration: FDA and cancer by Linas Garsys for The Washington Times

    KALLEY: FDA to breast cancer patients: Shut up and die

    At the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) these days, the little ladies are to be seen and barely heard. As if "Mad Men" were a documentary rather than a televised slice of 1960s life, a major medical decision looms and the women it affects most directly will be given only a superficial moment to share their substantive views. What do a bunch of gals have to tell the federal government, anyway?

  • Analysis details Avastin's rare fatal side effects

    A new analysis raises fresh questions about the risks of the blockbuster cancer drug Avastin, suggesting the chance of dying from side effects linked to it is higher than the risk for patients on chemotherapy alone.

More Stories →

Happening Now