Topic - Bob Cullen

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  • Paper maps: Amid GPS boom, nostalgia finds a place

    Used to be, Dad would stuff a half-dozen maps in the glove box before setting out with the family on a road trip to see the waterfalls at Yosemite or the granite faces of Mount Rushmore. Colorful maps bearing the logos of the oil companies that printed them _ names like Texaco, Gulf, Esso _ once brimmed from displays at filling stations, free for the taking.

  • In this Tuesday, May 8, 2012 photo a traditional road map of the Pittsburgh area and one showing the same region on an iPad are seen placed together in Moreland Hills, Ohio. Transportation agencies around the country are printing fewer maps to cut costs or just to acknowledge that public demand is down. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

    Paper maps: Amid GPS boom, nostalgia finds a place

    Used to be, Dad would stuff a half-dozen maps in the glove box before setting out with the family on a road trip to see the waterfalls at Yosemite or the granite faces of Mount Rushmore. Colorful maps bearing the logos of the oil companies that printed them — names like Texaco, Gulf, Esso — once brimmed from displays at filling stations, free for the taking.

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Quotations
  • Transportation departments around the country are in the middle of reprioritizing their spending amid times of falling revenue, and paper maps could be on the chopping block, said Bob Cullen, spokesman for the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.

    Paper maps: Amid GPS boom, nostalgia finds a place →

  • "The GPS of course now being so available, a lot of new cars are coming out with built-in GPS. People are utilizing those, and they don't want a road map," he said. "A lot of the younger generation, they're used to having their phone, and they don't need a road map to figure out where to go."

    Paper maps: Amid GPS boom, nostalgia finds a place →

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