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amazon_air.jpeg

A Boeing 767, an Amazon.com "Prime Air" cargo plane is parked on display Thursday, Aug. 4, 2016, in a Boeing hangar in Seattle. Amazon unveiled its first branded cargo plane Thursday, one of 40 jetliners that will make up Amazon's own air transportation network of 40 Boeing jets leased from Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings and Air Transport Services Group Inc., which will operate the air cargo network. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

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Boeing executives offered no details a day after Iranian officials said an agreement to buy commercial planes from the Chicago-based company was essentially a done deal. Estimates say it will involve about 100 jets from Boeing and leasing companies. (Associated Press)

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Donald Trump's private Boeing jet had to make an emergency landing at Nashville airport on Wednesday, according to federal authorities. (Associated Press)

YF22

YF22

LOCKHEED YF-22 Role: Stealth fighter technology demonstrator Manufacturer: Lockheed / Boeing / General Dynamics Status: Retired The Lockheed/Boeing/General Dynamics YF-22 was an American single-seat, twin-engine fighter aircraft technology demonstrator designed for the United States Air Force. The design was a finalist in the USAF's Advanced Tactical Fighter competition, and two prototypes were built for the demonstration/validation phase of the competition. The YF-22 won the contest against the Northrop YF-23, and entered production as the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor. The YF-22 has similar aerodynamic layout and configuration as the F-22, but with differences in the position and design of the cockpit, tail fins and wings, and in internal structural layout. In the 1980s, the USAF began looking for a replacement for its fighter aircraft, especially to counter the advanced Su-27 and MiG-29. A number of companies, divided into two teams, submitted their proposals. Northrop and McDonnell Douglas submitted the YF-23. Lockheed, Boeing and General Dynamics proposed and built the YF-22, which, although marginally slower and having a larger radar cross-section, was more agile than the YF-23. Primarily for this reason, it was picked by the Air Force as the winner of the ATF in April 1991. Following the selection, the first YF-22 was retired to a museum, while the second prototype continued flying until an accident relegated it to the role of an antenna test vehicle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

NextGenerationBomber

NextGenerationBomber

NEXT GENERATION BOMBER Role: Stealth bomber Manufacturer: Boeing/Lockheed Martin Status: Terminated The Next-Generation Bomber (formerly called the 2018 Bomber) was originally a program to develop a new medium bomber for the United States Air Force. The NGB was originally projected to enter service around 2018 as a stealthy, subsonic, medium-range, medium payload bomber to supplement and possibly to a limited degree replace the U.S. Air Force's aging bomber fleet (B-52 Stratofortress and B-1 Lancer). The NGB program was superseded by the Long-Range Strike-B (LRS-B) heavy bomber program.

YF-22

YF-22

LOCKHEED YF-22 Role: Stealth fighter technology demonstrator Manufacturer: Lockheed / Boeing / General Dynamics Status: Retired The Lockheed/Boeing/General Dynamics YF-22 was an American single-seat, twin-engine fighter aircraft technology demonstrator designed for the United States Air Force. The design was a finalist in the USAF's Advanced Tactical Fighter competition, and two prototypes were built for the demonstration/validation phase of the competition. The YF-22 won the contest against the Northrop YF-23, and entered production as the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor. The YF-22 has similar aerodynamic layout and configuration as the F-22, but with differences in the position and design of the cockpit, tail fins and wings, and in internal structural layout. In the 1980s, the USAF began looking for a replacement for its fighter aircraft, especially to counter the advanced Su-27 and MiG-29. A number of companies, divided into two teams, submitted their proposals. Northrop and McDonnell Douglas submitted the YF-23. Lockheed, Boeing and General Dynamics proposed and built the YF-22, which, although marginally slower and having a larger radar cross-section, was more agile than the YF-23. Primarily for this reason, it was picked by the Air Force as the winner of the ATF in April 1991. Following the selection, the first YF-22 was retired to a museum, while the second prototype continued flying until an accident relegated it to the role of an antenna test vehicle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Next-Generation Bomber

Next-Generation Bomber

NEXT GENERATION BOMBER Role: Stealth bomber Manufacturer: Boeing/Lockheed Martin Status: Terminated The Next-Generation Bomber (formerly called the 2018 Bomber) was originally a program to develop a new medium bomber for the United States Air Force. The NGB was originally projected to enter service around 2018 as a stealthy, subsonic, medium-range, medium payload bomber to supplement and possibly to a limited degree replace the U.S. Air Force's aging bomber fleet (B-52 Stratofortress and B-1 Lancer). The NGB program was superseded by the Long-Range Strike-B (LRS-B) heavy bomber program.

YF-22

YF-22

LOCKHEED YF-22 Role: Stealth fighter technology demonstrator Manufacturer: Lockheed / Boeing / General Dynamics Status: Retired The Lockheed/Boeing/General Dynamics YF-22 was an American single-seat, twin-engine fighter aircraft technology demonstrator designed for the United States Air Force. The design was a finalist in the USAF's Advanced Tactical Fighter competition, and two prototypes were built for the demonstration/validation phase of the competition. The YF-22 won the contest against the Northrop YF-23, and entered production as the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor. The YF-22 has similar aerodynamic layout and configuration as the F-22, but with differences in the position and design of the cockpit, tail fins and wings, and in internal structural layout. In the 1980s, the USAF began looking for a replacement for its fighter aircraft, especially to counter the advanced Su-27 and MiG-29. A number of companies, divided into two teams, submitted their proposals. Northrop and McDonnell Douglas submitted the YF-23. Lockheed, Boeing and General Dynamics proposed and built the YF-22, which, although marginally slower and having a larger radar cross-section, was more agile than the YF-23. Primarily for this reason, it was picked by the Air Force as the winner of the ATF in April 1991. Following the selection, the first YF-22 was retired to a museum, while the second prototype continued flying until an accident relegated it to the role of an antenna test vehicle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Next-Generation Bomber

Next-Generation Bomber

NEXT GENERATION BOMBER Role: Stealth bomber Manufacturer: Boeing/Lockheed Martin Status: Terminated The Next-Generation Bomber (formerly called the 2018 Bomber) was originally a program to develop a new medium bomber for the United States Air Force. The NGB was originally projected to enter service around 2018 as a stealthy, subsonic, medium-range, medium payload bomber to supplement and possibly to a limited degree replace the U.S. Air Force's aging bomber fleet (B-52 Stratofortress and B-1 Lancer). The NGB program was superseded by the Long-Range Strike-B (LRS-B) heavy bomber program.

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A new Boeing 737-900ER airplane being delivered to United Airlines is parked in front of Boeing's newly expanded 737 delivery center at Boeing Field in Seattle on Oct. 19, 2015. (Associated Press) **FILE**

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Boeing Bucks. Why did Hillary help Boeing get a contract in Russia? Could it have been the big donation her husband got? U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks while visiting Boeing's design center in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2009. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze)

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Boeing A-4 Skyhawk.jpg

Military Quiz-Boeing A-4 Skyhawk

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A Boeing B-29 Superfortress flies near the Washington Monument in Washington, Friday, May 8, 2015, during a flyover of World War II vintage aircrafts, marking the 70th anniversary of the end of the war in Europe on May 8, 1945, and commemorate the Allied victory in Europe during World War II. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

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Aerospace company Boeing has a patent for the "Method and system for shock wave attenuation via electromagnetic arc," which conjures up images of science fiction films like 1999's "Star Wars: Episode I: The Phantom Menace." (image: LucasFilm)

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Next Gen Fighter Boeing.jpg

F/A-XX concept drawing. (Boeing)

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An artist's rendering of what Boeing's Phantom Swift X-Plane will look like upon completion. (Image: Boeing)

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In this Aug. 6, 1945 file photo, the Enola Gay Boeing B-29 Superfortress lands at Tinian, Northern Mariana Islands after the U.S. atomic bombing mission against the Japanese city of Hiroshima. (AP Photo/Max Desfor)

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Pro-Palestinian activists blocked the entrance to a Boeing office in Washington state Monday morning, accusing the company of profiting from Israel's offensive in Gaza. (Twitter/Jewish Voice for Peace)

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Pro-Palestinian activists blocked the entrance to a Boeing office in Washington state Monday morning, accusing the company of profiting from Israel's offensive in Gaza. (Twitter/Jewish Voice for Peace)