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Luke Donald hits out of the pine straw along No. 9 fairway during the first round of the RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing on Thursday, April 13, 2017 at Harbour Town Golf Links on Hilton Head Island. Luke ended up the leader of the morning rounds at 6-under-par. (Jay Karr /The Island Packet via AP)

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Luke Donald, left, and Ernie Els share a moment as they wait to putt on No. 7 during the first round of the RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing on Thursday, April 13, 2017 at Harbour Town Golf Links on Hilton Head Island. (Jay Karr /The Island Packet via AP)

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Luke Donald chips onto No. 7 during the first round of the RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing on Thursday, April 13, 2017 at Harbour Town Golf Links on Hilton Head Island. Donald took the morning lead at the tournament at 6-under-par. (Jay Karr /The Island Packet via AP)

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Bud Cauley tees off on No. 17 during the first round of the RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing on Thursday, April 13, 2017 at Harbour Town Golf Links on Hilton Head Island. Cauley ended his round in sole possession of the tournament lead at 8-under-par. (Jay Karr /The Island Packet via AP)

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President Donald Trump talks with Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg upon his arrival on Air Force One at Charleston International Airport in North Charleston, S.C., Friday, Feb. 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) ** FILE **

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Boeing employees leave work during a shift change on Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017, in North Charleston, S.C. Thousands of production workers at Boeing's South Carolina plant are deciding whether they want to unionize, writing the next chapter in efforts to organize labor in large manufacturing plants across the South. The first round of voting began early Wednesday. (Wade Spees/The Post And Courier via AP)

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FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016 file photo, An engine and part of a wing from the 100th 787 Dreamliner to be built at Boeing of South Carolina's North Charleston, S.C., facility are seen outside the plant. The morning round of voting has concluded Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017, among South Carolina Boeing workers considering if they want representation by a union. Nearly 3,000 production workers are eligible to vote in the election to determine if they'll be represented by the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers. (Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier via AP, File)

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Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg, center, departs after meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg speaks to members of the media after meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg speaks to members of the media after meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg speaks to members of the media after meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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Lockheed Martin CEO Marillyn Hewson gave her "personal commitment" to driving down the price of the F-35 fighter jet after President-elect Donald Trump tweeted about going to competitor Boeing. (Associated Press)

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Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg speaks to members of the media after meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Mar-a-Lago, in Palm Beach, Fla., Wednesday, Dec. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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A Boeing 767, an Amazon.com "Prime Air" cargo plane is parked on display Thursday, Aug. 4, 2016, in a Boeing hangar in Seattle. Amazon unveiled its first branded cargo plane Thursday, one of 40 jetliners that will make up Amazon's own air transportation network of 40 Boeing jets leased from Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings and Air Transport Services Group Inc., which will operate the air cargo network. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

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Boeing executives offered no details a day after Iranian officials said an agreement to buy commercial planes from the Chicago-based company was essentially a done deal. Estimates say it will involve about 100 jets from Boeing and leasing companies. (Associated Press)

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Donald Trump's private Boeing jet had to make an emergency landing at Nashville airport on Wednesday, according to federal authorities. (Associated Press)

YF22

YF22

LOCKHEED YF-22 Role: Stealth fighter technology demonstrator Manufacturer: Lockheed / Boeing / General Dynamics Status: Retired The Lockheed/Boeing/General Dynamics YF-22 was an American single-seat, twin-engine fighter aircraft technology demonstrator designed for the United States Air Force. The design was a finalist in the USAF's Advanced Tactical Fighter competition, and two prototypes were built for the demonstration/validation phase of the competition. The YF-22 won the contest against the Northrop YF-23, and entered production as the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor. The YF-22 has similar aerodynamic layout and configuration as the F-22, but with differences in the position and design of the cockpit, tail fins and wings, and in internal structural layout. In the 1980s, the USAF began looking for a replacement for its fighter aircraft, especially to counter the advanced Su-27 and MiG-29. A number of companies, divided into two teams, submitted their proposals. Northrop and McDonnell Douglas submitted the YF-23. Lockheed, Boeing and General Dynamics proposed and built the YF-22, which, although marginally slower and having a larger radar cross-section, was more agile than the YF-23. Primarily for this reason, it was picked by the Air Force as the winner of the ATF in April 1991. Following the selection, the first YF-22 was retired to a museum, while the second prototype continued flying until an accident relegated it to the role of an antenna test vehicle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

NextGenerationBomber

NextGenerationBomber

NEXT GENERATION BOMBER Role: Stealth bomber Manufacturer: Boeing/Lockheed Martin Status: Terminated The Next-Generation Bomber (formerly called the 2018 Bomber) was originally a program to develop a new medium bomber for the United States Air Force. The NGB was originally projected to enter service around 2018 as a stealthy, subsonic, medium-range, medium payload bomber to supplement and possibly to a limited degree replace the U.S. Air Force's aging bomber fleet (B-52 Stratofortress and B-1 Lancer). The NGB program was superseded by the Long-Range Strike-B (LRS-B) heavy bomber program.

YF-22

YF-22

LOCKHEED YF-22 Role: Stealth fighter technology demonstrator Manufacturer: Lockheed / Boeing / General Dynamics Status: Retired The Lockheed/Boeing/General Dynamics YF-22 was an American single-seat, twin-engine fighter aircraft technology demonstrator designed for the United States Air Force. The design was a finalist in the USAF's Advanced Tactical Fighter competition, and two prototypes were built for the demonstration/validation phase of the competition. The YF-22 won the contest against the Northrop YF-23, and entered production as the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor. The YF-22 has similar aerodynamic layout and configuration as the F-22, but with differences in the position and design of the cockpit, tail fins and wings, and in internal structural layout. In the 1980s, the USAF began looking for a replacement for its fighter aircraft, especially to counter the advanced Su-27 and MiG-29. A number of companies, divided into two teams, submitted their proposals. Northrop and McDonnell Douglas submitted the YF-23. Lockheed, Boeing and General Dynamics proposed and built the YF-22, which, although marginally slower and having a larger radar cross-section, was more agile than the YF-23. Primarily for this reason, it was picked by the Air Force as the winner of the ATF in April 1991. Following the selection, the first YF-22 was retired to a museum, while the second prototype continued flying until an accident relegated it to the role of an antenna test vehicle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Next-Generation Bomber

Next-Generation Bomber

NEXT GENERATION BOMBER Role: Stealth bomber Manufacturer: Boeing/Lockheed Martin Status: Terminated The Next-Generation Bomber (formerly called the 2018 Bomber) was originally a program to develop a new medium bomber for the United States Air Force. The NGB was originally projected to enter service around 2018 as a stealthy, subsonic, medium-range, medium payload bomber to supplement and possibly to a limited degree replace the U.S. Air Force's aging bomber fleet (B-52 Stratofortress and B-1 Lancer). The NGB program was superseded by the Long-Range Strike-B (LRS-B) heavy bomber program.