Topic - California Supreme Court

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  • Court orders release of names in police shootings

    The California Supreme Court ruled Thursday that police departments must in most cases divulge the names of officers involved in on-duty shootings.

  • Correction: Posthumous Lawyer Application story

    In a story May 5 about California law students seeking a posthumous law license for a prominent 19th Century Chinese figure, The Associated Press erroneously reported the middle name of the Chinese lawyer denied a license to practice in law in California because of his nationality. His name is Hong Yen Chang, not Hong Yeng Chang.

  • California top court hears defibrillator case

    The California Supreme Court appeared reluctant Tuesday to require large retailers to keep a defibrillator in stores in case customers suffer cardiac arrest.

  • This undated family photo shows Hong Yeng Chang. Chang was an Ivy League graduate thought to be the first Chinese-born, United States-trained lawyer when the California Supreme Court denied his application to practice law in a 1890 decision. Now, students at a Northern California law school hope to persuade the current court to reverse the 124-year-old decision that is still studied in law schools. (AP Photo/Chang Family)

    Law students push to license dead Chinese attorney

    In a decision still studied in law schools as a 19th century lesson in bigotry, the California Supreme Court in 1890 denied Hong Yen Chang's application to practice law solely because he was Chinese.

  • Court: Private email exempt from open records law

    A California appeals court has ruled that private text messages, emails and other electronic communications sent and received by public officials on their own devices are not public records regardless of the topic.

  • California high court upholds woman's execution

    The California Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the death penalty of a woman convicted of poisoning her husband to collect on a life insurance policy.

  • Judges consider altering liability in liquor cases

    California's highest court is considering a case that could crack a legal shield that has long protected party hosts in the state from most alcohol-related lawsuits, a newspaper reported Monday.

  • CA Supreme Court justice to retire

    The longest-serving current justice of the California Supreme Court announced Tuesday that she is retiring.

  • Correction: Legal License Fight story

    In a story Jan. 27 about the California Supreme Court's denial of a law license to former journalist Stephen Glass, The Associated Press relying on information from the court reported erroneously the publisher of a key article fabricated by Glass. The article "Hack Heaven" was published in The New Republic, not George magazine.

  • Appellate court will hear high-speed rail case

    The California Supreme Court on Wednesday transferred a legal appeal over the state's high-speed rail project to a state appellate court, declining to take up the case directly as Gov. Jerry Brown's administration had requested.

  • Calif. high court asked to take up high-speed rail

    Gov. Jerry Brown's administration on Friday petitioned the California Supreme Court to overturn two lower-court rulings that have stalled progress on the state's high-speed rail project, one of the nation's most expensive public works projects.

  • Calif. high court asked to take up high-speed rail

    Gov. Jerry Brown's administration on Friday petitioned the California Supreme Court to overturn two lower-court rulings that have stalled progress on the state's high-speed rail project, one of the nation's most expensive public works projects.

  • California Gov. Jerry Brown speaks on stage at the 23rd Annual Literary Awards at The Beverly Hills Hotel on Monday, Oct. 14, 2013, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

    Illegal immigrant granted law license in California

    The California Supreme Court ruled Thursday that an illegal immigrant can join the bar and begin to practice law in that state, granting a major symbolic victory to immigrant rights advocates who say it's a step on the path to equal treatment in employment law.

  • Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin said "no amount of legal wrangling" is going to undo the joy of gay couples who are now free to marry. (Associated Press)

    Proposition 8 backers can't halt gay marriage licenses

    A lawsuit that claims that California's Proposition 8, which defines marriage as between a man and a woman, is still in effect will go forward — but county clerks can continue to issue marriage licenses to gay couples, the California Supreme Court said Monday.

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