Topic - Center For Reproductive Rights

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  • Abortion doctors restrictions take root in South

    From Texas to Alabama, laws are being enacted that would greatly restrict access to abortion, forcing many women to travel hundreds of miles to find a clinic. The laws, requiring abortion doctors to have privileges to admit patients to local hospitals, could have a profound impact on women in poor and rural sections of the Bible Belt.

  • FILE - In this July 12, 2013 file photo, opponents and supporters of abortion rights rally in the State Capitol rotunda in Austin, Texas.  An advocacy group filed another federal lawsuit Wednesday, April 2, 2014, challenging a new provision in Texas' tough restrictions on abortion. The Center for Reproductive Rights asked an Austin-based judge to block enforcement of key portions of the law, including some which have yet to take effect. (AP Photo/Tamir Kalifa, File)

    2nd suit filed challenging Texas' new abortion law

    An advocacy group filed another federal lawsuit Wednesday challenging a new provision of Texas' tough restrictions on abortion, less than a week after an appeals court reversed a previous suit and found that the stricter limits don't impose an undue burden on women's health.

  • FILE - This Feb. 20, 2013 file photo shows a protesters outside the Red River Valley Women's Clinic, the state's sole abortion provider, in Fargo, N.D. The clinic has settled a lawsuit it filed over a new law requiring doctors who perform abortions to obtain hospital-admitting privileges. North Dakota Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem and the New York-based Center for Reproductive Rights, which is helping the Red River Women's Clinic, told The Associated Press on Friday, March 14, 2014,  that the case has been settled. (AP Photo/Dave Kolpack, File)

    APNewsBreak: North Dakota abortion lawsuit settled

    North Dakota's sole abortion clinic has settled a lawsuit it filed over a new law requiring doctors who perform abortions to obtain hospital-admitting privileges, officials said Friday.

  • Judge throws out Oklahoma morning-after pill law

    An Oklahoma County judge Thursday ruled the state's law that makes it harder for women to obtain the morning-after pill is unconstitutional and prohibited its enforcement.

  • Anti-abortion groups divided over legal tactics

    By adopting the nation's toughest abortion law in the face of certain legal challenge, Arkansas legislators have exposed sharp tactical divisions within the national anti-abortion movement.

  • Kenyan hospital imprisons new mothers with no money

    The director of the Pumwani Maternity Hospital, located in a hardscrabble neighborhood of downtown Nairobi, freely acknowledges what he is accused of: detaining mothers who can't pay their bills.

  • Kenya hospital imprisons new mothers with no money

    The director of the Pumwani Maternity Hospital, located in a hardscrabble neighborhood of downtown Nairobi, freely acknowledges what he's accused of: detaining mothers who can't pay their bills. Lazarus Omondi says it's the only way he can keep his medical center running.

  • **FILE** Anti-abortion and abortion rights supporters stand face to face Jan. 23, 2012, in front of the Supreme Court in Washington during the annual March For Life rally. (Associated Press)

    On abortion, both sides agree: Tickets offer stark choice

    President Obama wants to highlight the issue, and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney would rather not talk about it — but abortion and birth control are potent issues in the 2012 campaign.

  • Judge says Arizona's abortion ban can take effect

    Arizona's ban on abortions starting at 20 weeks of pregnancy is poised to take effect this week as scheduled after a federal judge ruled Monday that the new law is constitutional.

  • A New York judge said in ruling on a petition seeking to relax FDA rules on the morning-after pill that Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius could be added as a defendant. (Associated Press)

    Judge's ruling not an end to Plan B debate

    A federal judge Tuesday said that a last-minute Food and Drug Administration response to a citizen petition seeking to relax FDA rules regarding a birth-control product rendered moot a complaint to hold the agency in contempt of court.

  • Victoria Tindall, an Oklahoma assistant attorney general, answers a question following a hearing on a state abortion law on Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2011, in Oklahoma City. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

    Okla. judge blocks abortion law from taking effect

    An Oklahoma judge on Wednesday temporarily blocked from taking effect a new law designed to reduce the number of abortions performed in the state by restricting the ways in which doctors can treat women with abortion-inducing drugs.

  • Rights group slams Philippine abortion ban

    A U.S.-based rights group urged the Philippines on Monday to reform a tough anti-abortion law that it says has spawned widespread underground procedures that kill about 1,000 women each year in the predominantly Roman Catholic country.

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