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Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

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NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, stands in front of the Atlas V first stage booster which relies on Russian-made RD-180 rocket engines. Lawmakers and national security analysts said they were aghast that the military allowed itself to become so dependent on Russian military technology during an era of uneasy relations. (Associated Press)

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Head of US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, Charles Bolden, speaks during a press conference in Berlin, Monday, May 19, 2014. The head of NASA has dismissed concerns that friction with Russia might spell the end of the International Space Station. Russia’s deputy prime minister said last week that his country wouldn’t cooperate with the United States on the project beyond 2020. The move followed a decision by the United States to impose sanctions on Russia over its actions in Ukraine. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said Monday that the space station is run jointly by the U.S., Russia, Japan, Europe and Canada, and no single partner can terminate the project. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

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US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, Charles Bolden speaks during a press conference in Berlin, Monday, May 19, 2014. The head of NASA has dismissed concerns that friction with Russia might spell the end of the International Space Station. Russia’s deputy prime minister said last week that his country wouldn’t cooperate with the United States on the project beyond 2020. The move followed a decision by the United States to impose sanctions on Russia over its actions in Ukraine. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said Monday that the space station is run jointly by the U.S., Russia, Japan, Europe and Canada, and no single partner can terminate the project. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

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Head of US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, Charles Bolden, speaks during a press conference in Berlin, Monday, May 19, 2014. The head of NASA has dismissed concerns that friction with Russia might spell the end of the International Space Station. Russia’s deputy prime minister said last week that his country wouldn’t cooperate with the United States on the project beyond 2020. The move followed a decision by the United States to impose sanctions on Russia over its actions in Ukraine. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said Monday that the space station is run jointly by the U.S., Russia, Japan, Europe and Canada, and no single partner can terminate the project. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

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NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks during the memorial service for Neil Armstrong at the National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Thursday, September 13, 2012. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Congressman Ralph hall (R-Texas), center, is greets by astronaut Capt. Eugene Cernan, center, right, as NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, center left, greets others before the memorial service for Neil Armstrong. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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NASA Administrator Charles Bolden (left), accompanied by astronaut Capt. Mark Kelly, husband of wounded Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, speaks at the National Press Club in Washington on July 1, 2011. (Associated Press)

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration Administrator (NASA) Charles Bolden lays a wreath at a Challenger memorial, at Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Va., on Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, in commemoration of NASA's National Day of Remembrance. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration Administrator (NASA) Charles Bolden lays a wreath at a Challenger memorial, at Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Va., Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, in commemoration of NASA's National Day of Remembrance. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

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NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks to employees and guests prior to announcing the final destinations of the three remaining space shuttles at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, April 12, 2011.(AP Photo/John Raoux)

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ASSOCIATED PRESS NASA Administrator Charles Bolden testified on Capitol Hill in February 2010.