Topic - Christopher Adam

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  • File - A crowd of over 10,000 gather for the opening of the Terror House, a museum dedicated to the horrors of communism and the building where people were interrogated and tortured, Budapest, Hungary, in this Sunday, Feb. 24, 2002 file photo. People spied on by Hungary's communist-era secret police would have the right to destroy their surveillance reports under a government proposal historians say would damage the country's ability to acknowledge its past. Maria Schmidt, director of Budapest's House of Terror museum, said she hoped lawmakers would rethink the plan. "If these files are handed over, facts and connections will be no longer be able to be researched," Schmidt said. (AP Photo/Eileen Kovchok, file)

    Historians want Hungary communist files protected

    People spied on by Hungary's communist-era secret police will have the right to destroy their surveillance reports under a government proposal historians say would damage the country's ability to acknowledge its past.

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Quotations
  • "It is very difficult to see the destruction of Hungarian archives as anything other than a crude political move on the part of politicians who are concerned about potentially unpleasant and embarrassing documents on their relationship with the former regime that may one day be found by historians," wrote Adam, the Canadian lecturer and archivist.

    Historians want Hungary communist files protected →

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