Topic - Christopher Nowinski

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • Teddy Bridgewater went on to lead Louisville to one of the biggest upset in BCS bowl history after taking a brutal hit in the Sugar Bowl on Jan. 2. The NCAA scarcely mentions concussions in its manual. (Associated Press)

    NCAA playing catch-up with concussions

    In October, a helmet-to-helmet hit spun University of Southern California wide receiver Robert Woods around 180 degrees while he was blocking on a kick return against the University of Utah.

  • Teddy Bridgewater went on to lead Louisville to one of the biggest upset in BCS bowl history after taking a brutal hit in the Sugar Bowl on Jan. 2. The NCAA scarcely mentions concussions in its manual. (Associated Press)

    Blind side to concussions: NFL’s latest legal blows give feeble push to NCAA

    Head injuries have left the NFL under unflinching scrutiny over the past year. At the NCAA level, however, the issue has escaped similar furor.

  • 'Hoop Dreams' director takes on concussion issue

    The North Side Raiders look like little men as they take the field for their Pee Wee football game in the opening scene of "Head Games," their shoulder pads and helmets dwarfing the rest of their small bodies.

  • Advocacy group wants 'hit count' to protect kids

    Kids playing contact sports are suffering too many blows to the head, and an advocacy group is calling for a "hit count" to total them up before it's too late.

  • Chris Nowinski, co-founder of the Sports Legacy Institute, talks about a hit count proposal to dramatically reduce youth athletes' exposure to repetitive brain trauma in multiple sports during a news conference at the Super Bowl XLVI media center Friday, Feb. 3, 2012, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

    Advocacy group wants 'hit count' to protect kids

    The Sports Legacy Institute is proposing a "hit count" for young athletes to limit their exposure to potential brain trauma.

  • Nowinski hopes former players lend hand

    Already at the forefront of research on the effects of repeated blows to the head, Chris Nowinski is trying to raise awareness at a grass-roots level and he hopes former players will lend a hand.

  • Twellman: MLS team ignored my concussions

    Former New England Revolution star Taylor Twellman said Friday that the Major League Soccer team ignored his symptoms of multiple concussions, even sending him back on the field after he said "I have a concussion" following the hit that eventually forced him to retire.

  • Study: Duerson had brain damage at time of suicide

    Dave Duerson, a former NFL player who committed suicide in February, had "moderately advanced" brain damage related to blows to the head, according to the researcher who made the diagnosis.

  • FILE - In this Aug. 14, 1989, file photo, Chicago Bears safety Dave Duerson (22) scrambles for running room after intercepting a pass as Miami Dolphins Jeff Uhlenhake (63) grabs hold during an NFL football game in Miami. Duerson, a four-time Pro Bowl safety who played on Super Bowl winners with the Chicago Bears and New York Giants, has died. He was 50.  Miami-Dade Police Detective Robert Williams says Duerson's body  was found Thursday in Sunny Isles Beach, Fla. Investigators have not determined the cause of death.  (AP Photo/File)

    Duerson's kin donating his brain for research

    The family of former Bears safety Dave Duerson has agreed to donate his brain for research into chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a condition linked to athletes who have sustained repeated concussions.

  • FILE- In this Oct. 3, 2010, file photo, Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver Jordan Shipley is checked by medical personnel after a hard hit from Cleveland Browns safety T.J. Ward in the fourth quarter of an NFL football game in Cleveland. The violent hit that left Shipley with a concussion was an illegal one, earning Browns safety T.J. Ward a $15,000 fine. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)

    Broadcasters adapt as focus on concussions changes

    The violent hit that left Cincinnati Bengals receiver Jordan Shipley with a concussion was an illegal one, earning Cleveland Browns safety T.J. Ward a $15,000 fine.

  • Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver Jordan Shipley (11) drops the ball as he is hit in the end zone between Cleveland Browns cornerback Eric Wright (left) and safety T.J. Ward (43) during an NFL football game in Cleveland earlier this month. The violent hit that left Shipley with a concussion was an illegal one, earning Ward a $15,000 fine. (Associated Press)

    Commentators set tone on NFL concussions debate

    Football's violent nature is part of its wide appeal. But as more is learned about the long-term damage of head trauma and the NFL puts increased emphasis on preventing concussions, broadcasters have to walk a fine line between savoring good, tough play and glorifying hits that can cause serious harm.

  • Poster latest show of NFL concussion reality

    The HBO cameras are rolling in New York, where this season's "Hard Knocks" could make a star out of Jets coach Rex Ryan _ and send parents across the country scurrying for the mute button on the remote control.

More Stories →

Quotations
Happening Now