Topic - Congress

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • Riverways focus of tussle between state, feds

    The business model is pretty simple at Harvey's Alley Spring Canoe Rental.

  • Illustration on sentencing and recidivism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

    DeROCHE: Not just clemency, but smarter sentencing

    President Obama's decision to grant clemency to a large number of nonviolent offenders in federal prison has ignited a much-needed national discussion on criminal justice reform, but voices on both sides are missing some key underlining problems.

  • FILE - In this March 18, 2014 file photo, U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., greets guests during Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn's election night reception in Chicago. Durbin is being challenged by Republican Jim Oberweis in the November election and said he is taking his opponent seriously, even if many others are not. Political prognosticators and even some top Republicans say Durbin’s rival is a long shot to unseat the Senate’s second-ranking Democrat. (AP Photo/Andrew A. Nelles, File)

    EDITORIAL: Bribery (aka the earmark) attempts a comeback in Congress

    Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin is upset. The $3.5 trillion that Congress spends each year is just chicken feed, and Mr. Durbin is a fan of pork. He wants Congress to get a bigger barrel.

  • In this photo taken on Friday, April 18, 2014, Guy Relford, an attorney specializing in gun rights, poses outside his law office in Carmel, Ind. Redford is also the owner and instructor at Tactical Firearms Training teaching firearm safety as well as a comprehensive Indiana gun law course.   (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

    NRA calls for universal conceal carry gun law for crossing state lines

    With concealed weapons now legal in all 50 states, the National Rifle Association's focus at this week's annual meeting is less about enacting additional state protections than on making sure the permits already issued still apply when the gun owners travel across the country.

  • Washington loses waiver on No Child Left Behind

    Washington state is losing its independence to decide the best way to spend about $40 million in federal dollars to improve how students perform in its public schools, education officials said Thursday.

  • ** FILE **  Former Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer, shown here in Helena, Mont., August, 2012, says he will not run for Montana's open U.S. Senate seat in 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Gouras, File)

    Former Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer: Congress as popular as a cockroach

    Former Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer said that his home state does not have a high opinion of Congress, suggesting voters view it in the same light as insect pests.

  • Illustration on improving U.S.-Asia trade by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

    WAGONER: Protectionists blocking trade with Asia

    President Obama's trip to Japan is already a missed opportunity — and Congress deserves a share of the blame.

  • Kansas joining compact against federal health law

    Kansas is joining a proposed compact with other states that hope to exempt themselves from the federal health care overhaul, and Republican Gov. Sam Brownback on Wednesday rejected criticism that the move will jeopardize seniors' benefits.

  • Spy plane outlasts Cold War, but not defense cuts

    The U-2 spy plane outlasted the Cold War, outlived its successor and proved crucial a half-century ago when two superpowers were on the brink of nuclear war.

  • FILE - This Oct. 13, 2013 file photo shows Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaking in Philadelphia. The Supreme Court on Wednesday said a federal law limits how much money victims of child pornography can recover from people who viewed their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the Internet. Kennedy said for the court that federal judges should exercise discretion in awarding restitution. The case involved a woman known in court papers by the pseudonym "Amy." Her losses have been pegged at nearly $3.4 million, based on the ongoing Internet trade and viewing of images of her being raped by her uncle when she was 8 and 9 years old.  (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

    Divided court strikes down big porn award

    Victims of child pornography should be awarded restitution from persons convicted of having or viewing their images — but the amount of payment has to fit the scale of the offense, a divided Supreme Court ruled Wednesday.

  • FILE - This Oct. 13, 2013 file photo shows Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaking in Philadelphia. The Supreme Court on Wednesday said a federal law limits how much money victims of child pornography can recover from people who viewed their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the Internet. Kennedy said for the court that federal judges should exercise discretion in awarding restitution. The case involved a woman known in court papers by the pseudonym "Amy." Her losses have been pegged at nearly $3.4 million, based on the ongoing Internet trade and viewing of images of her being raped by her uncle when she was 8 and 9 years old.  (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

    High court nixes $3.4M award to child porn victim

    The Supreme Court on Wednesday rejected a plea to make it easier for victims of child pornography to collect money from people who view their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the Internet. Two dissenting justices said Congress should change the law to benefit victims.

  • FILE - In this May 30, 2012, file photo, former U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens speaks at a lecture presented by the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Ark. In the aftermath of the Connecticut school shootings that left 20 first-graders and six educators dead, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens began thinking about ways to prevent a repeat. The result is Stevens' new book,  his second since retiring from the court at age 90, in which he calls for no fewer than six changes to the Constitution, of which two are directly related to guns.  (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)

    Retired justice proposes changes to Constitution

    In his new book, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens calls for no fewer than six changes to the Constitution, two of which are directly related to guns. Others would abolish the death penalty, make it easier to limit spending on elections and rein in partisan drawing of electoral districts.

  • Recent editorials published in Indiana newspapers

    Evansville Courier & Press. April 21, 2014.

  • Competition? Sen. Elizabeth Warren's splashy new memoir could diminish public interest in Hillary Clinton's potential run for the White House. (Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.)

    Inside the Beltway: The Elizabeth Warren effect

    A little luster has worn off the Hillary Clinton White House parlor game. Anxious, fickle analysts have been interrupted in their quest to decipher if Mrs. Clinton will run for president in 2016. Why, there's another prospect. Behold, it's Sen. Elizabeth Warren brandishing her splashy new memoir titled "A Fighting Chance."

  • EDITORIAL: Downsize bloated National Park Service

    The National Park Service is waiving entrance fees to America's national parks and historic sites during National Parks Week. The freebies continue until April 27, but taxpayers aren't getting a bargain, considering that the swollen agency spends $2.6 billion a year.

More Stories →

Happening Now