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  • Riverways focus of tussle between state, feds

    The business model is pretty simple at Harvey's Alley Spring Canoe Rental.

  • FILE - This Oct. 13, 2013 file photo shows Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaking in Philadelphia. The Supreme Court on Wednesday said a federal law limits how much money victims of child pornography can recover from people who viewed their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the Internet. Kennedy said for the court that federal judges should exercise discretion in awarding restitution. The case involved a woman known in court papers by the pseudonym "Amy." Her losses have been pegged at nearly $3.4 million, based on the ongoing Internet trade and viewing of images of her being raped by her uncle when she was 8 and 9 years old.  (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

    High court nixes $3.4M award to child porn victim

    The Supreme Court on Wednesday rejected a plea to make it easier for victims of child pornography to collect money from people who view their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the Internet. Two dissenting justices said Congress should change the law to benefit victims.

  • Illustration on improving U.S.-Asia trade by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

    WAGONER: Protectionists blocking trade with Asia

    President Obama's trip to Japan is already a missed opportunity — and Congress deserves a share of the blame.

  • FILE - This Oct. 13, 2013 file photo shows Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaking in Philadelphia. The Supreme Court on Wednesday said a federal law limits how much money victims of child pornography can recover from people who viewed their images online, throwing out a nearly $3.4 million judgment in favor of a woman whose childhood rape has been widely seen on the Internet. Kennedy said for the court that federal judges should exercise discretion in awarding restitution. The case involved a woman known in court papers by the pseudonym "Amy." Her losses have been pegged at nearly $3.4 million, based on the ongoing Internet trade and viewing of images of her being raped by her uncle when she was 8 and 9 years old.  (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

    Divided court strikes down big porn award

    Victims of child pornography should be awarded restitution from persons convicted of having or viewing their images — but the amount of payment has to fit the scale of the offense, a divided Supreme Court ruled Wednesday.

  • Kansas joining compact against federal health law

    Kansas is joining a proposed compact with other states that hope to exempt themselves from the federal health care overhaul, and Republican Gov. Sam Brownback on Wednesday rejected criticism that the move will jeopardize seniors' benefits.

  • Spy plane outlasts Cold War, but not defense cuts

    The U-2 spy plane outlasted the Cold War, outlived its successor and proved crucial a half-century ago when two superpowers were on the brink of nuclear war.

  • FILE - In this May 30, 2012, file photo, former U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens speaks at a lecture presented by the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, Ark. In the aftermath of the Connecticut school shootings that left 20 first-graders and six educators dead, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens began thinking about ways to prevent a repeat. The result is Stevens' new book,  his second since retiring from the court at age 90, in which he calls for no fewer than six changes to the Constitution, of which two are directly related to guns.  (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)

    Retired justice proposes changes to Constitution

    In his new book, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens calls for no fewer than six changes to the Constitution, two of which are directly related to guns. Others would abolish the death penalty, make it easier to limit spending on elections and rein in partisan drawing of electoral districts.

  • Lois Lerner, who led the tax-exempt organizations division of the Internal Revenue Service, has been put on administrative leave. The second IRS official removed over the recent scandal, Ms. Lerner has been accused of misleading an investigation into the division. (Associated Press)

    ISTOOK: Congress on its own can arrest and jail Lois Lerner until she testifies on IRS scandal

    On its own, Congress has clear authority to arrest and jail Lois Lerner until she testifies. That is the best way to end the stonewalling about the IRS' targeting of the Tea Party and other conservatives.

  • EDITORIAL: Downsize bloated National Park Service

    The National Park Service is waiving entrance fees to America's national parks and historic sites during National Parks Week. The freebies continue until April 27, but taxpayers aren't getting a bargain, considering that the swollen agency spends $2.6 billion a year.

  • Recent editorials published in Indiana newspapers

    Evansville Courier & Press. April 21, 2014.

  • Competition? Sen. Elizabeth Warren's splashy new memoir could diminish public interest in Hillary Clinton's potential run for the White House. (Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.)

    Inside the Beltway: The Elizabeth Warren effect

    A little luster has worn off the Hillary Clinton White House parlor game. Anxious, fickle analysts have been interrupted in their quest to decipher if Mrs. Clinton will run for president in 2016. Why, there's another prospect. Behold, it's Sen. Elizabeth Warren brandishing her splashy new memoir titled "A Fighting Chance."

  • Cruisers go into 'laid up' status at Pearl Harbor

    A 20-year-old guided-missile cruiser will join two other ships in "laid up" status at Pearl Harbor.

  • In God We Trust Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

    DiBACCO: Reviving 'In God We Trust'

    On April 22, 1864 — 150 years ago — Congress authorized that all newly minted coins be inscribed with "In God We Trust."

  • ** FILE ** The General Electric logo (Associated Press)

    KATZ: A case for ending corporate welfare

    Authorization for the Export-Import Bank expires Sept. 30, and Congress must decide whether to renew the charter of the taxpayer-funded outfit. Proponents claim that "Ex-Im" is needed to fill gaps in private financing, which might sound plausible if not for the roster of monster corporations that pocket most of the subsidies. That list includes:

  • The Senate Banking Committee this month is expected to mark up the bipartisan bill drafted last month by Chairman Tim Johnson, South Dakota Democrat (left), and the committee's ranking minority member, Sen. Mike Crapo, Idaho Republican (right), The bill would phase out Fannie and Freddie while setting up a new agency to offer a much more limited government guarantee on securities backed by prime mortgages. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

    Stalemate on the Hill may spare Fannie and Freddie from reform

    Stepped-up demands from liberal Democrats and conservative Republicans are threatening the prospects for legislation to revive and reform the private mortgage market, six years after it collapsed and largely disappeared during the Great Recession.

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