Consumer Product Safety Commission

Latest Consumer Product Safety Commission Items
  • EDITORIAL: CPSC's database of doom

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission finalized a new rule Nov. 24 that abandons both consumers and safety. Trial lawyers and unscrupulous business competitors, though, made out like bandits. American manufacturers and tradesmen are the ones left with empty pockets.


  • Parents are creating a backlash against popular Disney Channel shows such as Miley Cyrus' "Hannah Montana."

    EDITORIAL: Bureaucrats way out of tune

    The government wants to regulate Hannah Montana CDs and DVDs. The bureaucrats at the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) insist that the discs marketed to children be tested for lead, but when the same young starlet churns out raunchier material under her real name, Miley Cyrus, they will escape scrutiny. Never mind that the same 10-year-olds will likely end up buying both products.


  • The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and Health Canada, in cooperation with Fisher-Price, announced a voluntary recall of the Fisher-Price Trikes and Tough Trikes toddler tricycles because a child can strike, sit or fall on the protruding plastic ignition key, resulting in serious injury, including genital bleeding. (AP Photo/U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission)

    Fisher-Price recalls more than 11 million items

    Fisher-Price is recalling more than 11 million tricycles, toys and high chairs over safety concerns.


  • Safety rules threaten use of kids' science kits

    One of the tools that teachers use to get children excited about science — hands-on science kits — faces an uncertain future amid a debate on safety.


  • This undated handout photo provided by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) shows a baby doll on a sleep positioner. The government is warning parents and caregivers to stop using infant sleep positioners _ a soft fabric products that anxious parents put in the crib to keep babies safely sleeping on their backs. (AP Photo/CPSC)

    Govt warns about sleep positioners

    Those soft fabric sleep positioners that parents put in the crib to keep babies safely sleeping on their backs could be dangerous, even deadly, for little ones, the government warned Wednesday.


  • This undated handout photo provided by the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) shows a Delta crib. More than 2 million cribs from seven companies were recalled Thursday amid concerns that babies can suffocate, become trapped or fall from the cribs. (AP Photo/CPSC)

    EDITORIAL: The red tape stimulus

    The latest dictates from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) will drive up the cost of manufacturing products intended for children. The agency adopted a pair of new rules in July and August implementing the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, but as drafted, these regulations will force companies to waste time and money on redundant testing programs solely for the entertainment of bureaucratic busybodies.


  • This undated handout photo provided by the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) shows a Delta crib. More than 2 million cribs from seven companies were recalled Thursday amid concerns that babies can suffocate, become trapped or fall from the cribs. (AP Photo/CPSC)

    2 million cribs recalled over safety concerns

    More than 2 million cribs from Evenflo, Delta Enterprise Corp. and five other companies were recalled Thursday amid concerns that babies can suffocate, become trapped or fall from the cribs.


  • Recalled toys may threaten environment

    NEW YORK (AP) — Now that toy companies have issued recalls for millions of Chinese-made toys tainted with lead or are otherwise hazardous to children, they are scrambling to figure out what to do with them.


  • Mattel recalls millions of toys made in China

    Toy giant Mattel yesterday announced that it was recalling more than 18 million Chinese-made toys worldwide for safety reasons, more than half from the U.S., in the latest episode of snowballing problems with Chinese imports.


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