Topic - D. Salinger

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  • BOOK REVIEW: 'My Salinger Year'

    "My Salinger Year" is a slightly fictionalized memoir of a year author Joanna Rakoff spent working for a top New York literary agency. It's 1996. She's just dropped out of graduate school because she wants to produce literature, not analyze it.

  • J.D. Salinger (far left) is shown with fellow World War II counterintelligence officers in archival material obtained and used by director Shane Salerno in "Salinger." (WEINSTEIN COMPANY VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS)

    MOVIE REVIEW: 'Salinger'

    Who is J.D. Salinger, the man behind Holden Caulfield? An angry, narcissistic recluse? A shell-shocked combat veteran who could never chase the smell of burning flesh from his consciousness? A serial exploiter of women? An unwitting prophet of death?

  • Veto of NH bill to protect Salinger privacy stands

    New Hampshire lawmakers have failed to get enough votes to override the governor's veto of a bill sought by J.D. Salinger's family to prevent inappropriate commercial exploitation beyond a person's death.

  • NH gov vetoes Salinger-inspired bill on identity

    New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch has vetoed a bill motivated by J.D. Salinger's family to prevent inappropriate commercial exploitation beyond a person's death.

  • Lynch

    Inside Politics: New Hampshire governor vetoes bill inspired by Salinger

    New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch has vetoed a bill motivated by J.D. Salinger's family to prevent inappropriate commercial exploitation beyond a person's death.

  • In this image made available Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2011, by the University of East Anglia, Donald Hartog and J.D. Salinger, right, pose together in London in 1989, when they met for the first time since 1938. A trove of letters written by Salinger to British friend Donald Hartog reveals a sociable man who took bus trips to Niagara Falls, ate fast-food hamburgers, enjoyed watching Tim Henman play tennis -- and claimed always to be writing new work. (AP Photo/Salinger Collection, University of East Anglia)

    Letters reveal human side of JD Salinger

    He had a reputation as a literary recluse, but a trove of previously unseen letters written by J.D. Salinger to a British friend reveals a sociable man who took bus trips to Niagara Falls, ate fast-food hamburgers, enjoyed watching tennis and claimed always to be writing new work.

  • In this image made available Wednesday Jan. 26, 2011, by the University of East Anglia,  Donald Hartog and J.D. Salinger, right, pose together in London in 1989, when they met for the first time since 1938. A trove of letters written by Salinger to British friend Donald Hartog reveals a sociable man who took bus trips to Niagara Falls, ate fast-food hamburgers, enjoyed watching Tim Henman play tennis - and claimed always to be writing new work. The letters were written to Don Hartog, who met Salinger in 1938 when both were teenagers, sent by their families to study German in Vienna. They corresponded after returning home - Salinger to try his hand as a writer, Hartog eventually to go into the food import-export business.(AP Photo/Salinger Collection, University of East Anglia)  EDITORIAL USE ONLY:

    Letters reveal human side of JD Salinger

    He had a reputation as a literary recluse, but a trove of previously unseen letters written by J.D. Salinger to a British friend reveals a sociable man who took bus trips to Niagara Falls, ate fast-food hamburgers, enjoyed watching tennis and claimed always to be writing new work.

  • Letters reveal human side of JD Salinger

    He had a reputation as a literary recluse, but a trove of previously unseen letters written by J.D. Salinger to a British friend reveals a sociable man who took bus trips to Niagara Falls, ate fast-food hamburgers, enjoyed watching tennis and claimed always to be writing new work.

  • ** FILE ** J.D. Salinger, best known for his novel "The Catcher in the Rye," is shown in a 1951 photograph. (AP Photo)

    'Catcher' author J.D. Salinger dies

    J.D. Salinger -- the legendary author, youth hero and fugitive from fame whose "The Catcher in the Rye" shocked and inspired a world he increasingly shunned -- has died. He was 91.

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Quotations
  • This sense of intimate connection, she realized, explained why correspondents often confided their anxieties and sorrows to Salinger, and why, too, the emotional toll of this would be so great that he would refuse to read their letters.

    BOOK REVIEW: 'My Salinger Year' →

  • The Glass family that he writes about is "a family in mourning, never to recover."

    BOOK REVIEW: 'My Salinger Year' →

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