Topic - Daniel Byman

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Quotations
  • "The opposition remains disorganized," said Daniel Byman, a professor in the security studies program at Georgetown University.

    Syrian opposition unready for fall of Assad →

  • With diplomats and spies now destined to be "more confined to well-guarded parts of capital cities," Mr. Byman noted, U.S. intelligence "is likely to decline" and, "in the long-run, diminishing U.S. capabilities could pose a grave danger to U.S. security, increasing the risk of a surprise attack or regional development that catches the U.S. unawares."

    Benghazi response may encourage more jihadist attacks in N. Africa →

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