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Illustration on the radicalization of the Democratic Party by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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Illustration on the decline of conviction for God and religion in the Democratic Party by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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Illustration on the elderly Democratic Party's presidential front runners by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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One analyst suggests former Manhattan mayor Michael Bloomberg could be the mystery candidate to save the Democratic Party in 2016. (associated press)

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Among the Democratic Party's activists and grass-roots supporters who favor the deal, Sen. Charles E. Schumer of New York has become the main target.

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Arlen Specter, former US Senator from Pennsylvania - Specter was a Democrat from 1951 to 1965, then a Republican from 1965 until 2009, when he switched back to the Democratic Party. He wrote in his 2009 statement, "While I have been comfortable being a Republican, my Party has not defined who I am. ...I have decided to run for re-election in 2010 in the Democratic primary. [but] I will not be an automatic 60th vote for cloture."

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Gabrielle Giffords, former US Representative from Arizona - Reportedly inspired by Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor to register as a Republican at age 18, Giffords switched to the Democratic Party in 2000 to run for a seat in the Arizona State House. She went on to serve in the Arizona Senate and the US House of Representatives as a Democrat, before surviving a 2011 assassination attempt in Arizona.

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Michael Bloomberg, former Mayor of New York City - Bloomberg was a lifelong member of the Democratic Party before deciding to run for elective office. He switched his party affiliation to Republican to run for mayor of New York City in 2001. He won his first and second terms as a Republican, but then left the party while in office. He was elected to a third term in 2009 as an Independent.

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Hillary Rodham Clinton's plan served as a bid to satisfy the Democratic Party's liberal base, which wants a more aggressive effort on climate change than President Obama has been able to muster. (Associated Press)

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Illustration on the Democratic party's push for socialism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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stun gun: "As of now, the discussions on a presidential system, a dictatorship, [have] come to an end," said Selahattin Demirtas (center), co-chairman of the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP). (Associated Press)

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Pastor Corey Brooks, a prominent Chicago pastor, believes the black community has been forsaken by the Democratic Party and has invited all the 2016 Republican presidential candidates to the troubled Woodlawn neighborhood in an effort to inform and mobilize voters. (CBS)

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Supporters of Selahattin Demirtas, co-chairman of the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party, rally for imprisoned rebel leader Abdullah Ocalan. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan isn't on the ballot in next week's elections, but the pro-Kurdish party could imperil the dominant leader's political future. (Associated Press)

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Specialists say the recent episodes of weighing in on issues like immigration and trade are part of President Obama's larger effort to remain relevant during his so-called "lame-duck" period and to not let Hillary Rodham Clinton take the helm of the Democratic Party, despite her status as the 2016 presidential front-runner. (Associated Press)

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Hillary Rodham Clinton has been under intense pressure from her Democratic Party's left wing to embrace a plan to expand Social Security benefits and pay for it with increased taxes on wealthy Americans. (Associated Press)

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton waves as she arrives at the Iowa Statehouse to meet with Democratic Party lawmakers, Wednesday, April 15, 2015, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall) ** FILE **

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John Podesta, now chairman of Hillary Clinton for America, is on the team rebranding the Democratic Party's new presidential candidate. (Associated Press)

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts has amassed a solidly liberal record, but it's the issues on which she has taken the lead that are winning over the Democratic Party's left wing, who say she is a fighter more than anything else. (Associated Press)

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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, of California, talks as she and Rep. Steve Israel, D-N.Y., chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee receive updates of Election Eay information from Greg Jackson, field director of Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee at the Democratic Party headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

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Illustration on the Democratic party in trouble by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency