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Mideast Israel Daily life.JPEG-09e10.jpg

Lightning strikes down during a storm over the Mediterranean sea near a cargo ship off the coast near Michmoret, Israel, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

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2014 11 23 12 57 40

Mayor Marion Barry with his son, Christopher, as he prepares to meet reporters on May 21, 1998, to announce he would not seek a fifth term as mayor. (Associated Press/George Bridges)

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Neil G. Kornze, director of the Bureau of Land Management, makes point during news conference in the State Capitol in Denver on Friday, Nov. 21, 2014. Federal and state officials reached an agreement that they hope will help protect the Roan Plateau in north-central Colorado while also encouraging natural gas development. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

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The 2014 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrives by flatbed truck from Chippewa National Forest in Cass Lake, Minnesota and is set down in the ground on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Friday, November 21, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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The 2014 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrives by flatbed truck from Chippewa National Forest in Cass Lake, Minnesota and is set down in the ground on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Friday, November 21, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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The 2014 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrives by flatbed truck from Chippewa National Forest in Cass Lake, Minnesota and is set down in the ground on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Friday, November 21, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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The 2014 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrives by flatbed truck from Chippewa National Forest in Cass Lake, Minnesota and is set down in the ground on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Friday, November 21, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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The 2014 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrives by flatbed truck from Chippewa National Forest in Cass Lake, Minnesota and is set down in the ground on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Friday, November 21, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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The 2014 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrives by flatbed truck from Chippewa National Forest in Cass Lake, Minnesota and is set down in the ground on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Friday, November 21, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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The 2014 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrives by flatbed truck from Chippewa National Forest in Cass Lake, Minnesota and is set down in the ground on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Friday, November 21, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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The 2014 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrives by flatbed truck from Chippewa National Forest in Cass Lake, Minnesota and is set down in the ground on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Friday, November 21, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Capitol Hill Christmas Tree.JPEG-0fac7.jpg

The U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrives at the West Front of the Capitol in Washington, Friday, Nov. 21, 2014. The 88-foot white spruce from the Chippewa National Forest, was cut in northern Minnesota on Oct. 29. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

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The U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrives at the West Front of the Capitol in Washington, Friday, Nov. 21, 2014. The 88-foot white spruce from the Chippewa National Forest, was cut in northern Minnesota on Oct. 29. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

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A group of Harvard law, graduate and undergraduate students is suing to compel Harvard to withdraw its investments in oil, coal and natural gas. (Harvard Climate Justice Coalition v. Harvard)

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U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program Coordinator Dr. Charles Mandeville said that there is no quick fix for the nation's preparedness efforts. It would take at least 20 years to finish installing and making fully operational all instrumentation on "high-threat" and "very high-threat" volcanoes if funding does not increase. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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D.C. Department of Health Director Dr. Joxel Garcia (Photo courtesy of U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)

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Nest Thermostat. Man, it is cold outside! That doesn't mean it can't be comfy inside. With the Nest Thermostat, it learns (yes, learns) your habits based on the temperature changes you make in the house and designs an internal climate pattern for you. It also helps you to see if you are saving energy by adjusting the temperature. With the remote control feature on the smart phone app, you can be saving money and being more comfortable in no time. The Nest Thermostat is available for purchase on their website or at major retailers. Prices range from $209 to $249. (Photo courtesy of Nest)

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State of Hawaii Insurance Commissioner Gordon Ito, testifies before the House Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on Capitol Hill on the current state of volcanic hazards in the United States, Washington, D.C., Wednesday, November 19, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program Coordinator Dr. Charles Mandeville testifies before the House Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on Capitol Hill on the current state of volcanic hazards in the United States, Washington, D.C., Wednesday, November 19, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Wyoming State Geological Survey Director and State Geologist Tom Drean testifies before the House Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on Capitol Hill on the current state of volcanic hazards in the United States, Washington, D.C., Wednesday, November 19, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)