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FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2017, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks to employees of the EPA in Washington. Pruitt’s schedule shows he met with Dow CEO Andrew Liveris for about a half hour on March 9 during a conference held a Houston hotel. Twenty days later Pruitt announced his decision to deny a petition to ban Dow’s chlorpyrifos pesticide from being sprayed on food, despite a review by his agency’s own scientists that concluded ingesting even minuscule amounts of the chemical can interfere with the brain development of fetuses and infants. EPA released a copy of Pruitt’s March meeting schedule earlier this month following several Freedom of Information Act requests. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

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Illustration on the EPA's threats to private property rights by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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Illustration on EPA deception by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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This photo supplied by the Environmental Protection Agency shows oil trapped by a berm and siphon dam in a dry ravine where the oil from a Chevron spill was stopped March 7, 2017, near Rangely, Colo. Chevron Corp. says its crews are cleaning up about 4,800 gallons of oil that spilled from a failed pipeline into an intermittent stream on public land in northwestern Colorado. State officials said Tuesday, March 14, 2017, that the oil travelled about 2 miles downstream along an unnamed tributary of Stinking Water Creek in Rio Blanco County. (Environmental Protection Agency via AP)

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Illustration on how the EPA needs to release its scientific findings by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

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Brian Kelly with the EPA uses a flash light to shows containers of chemicals in one of the buildings in the former RocK Tenn paper mill site on Helen Avenue in Otsego, Mich. (Mark Bugnaski/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group via AP)

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Brian Kelly with the EPA walks around the former RocK Tenn paper mill site on Helen Avenue in Otsego, Mich. (Mark Bugnaski/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group via AP)

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Brian Kelly with the EPA uses a flash light to show barrels of chemicals that have been collected for classification and removal from around the former Rock Tenn paper mill site on Helen Avenue in Otsego, Mich. (Mark Bugnaski/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group via AP)

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The former Adams Plating Company, which is now an EPA Superfund Cleanup Site is pictured on Thursday, March 2, 2017, in Lansing, Mich. (Julia Nagy /Lansing State Journal via AP)

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FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2017 file photo, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks in Washington. While Oklahoma’s attorney general, emails show that new Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt was in frequent contact with fossil fuel companies and special interest groups working to undermine federal efforts to curb planet-warming carbon emissions. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

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FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2017, file photo,Environmental Protection Agency Administrator nominee, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. Senate Republicans are poised to use their majority to confirm Pruitt to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, despite calls from Democrats for a delay.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

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Illustration on curbing the EPA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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Prospects for the EPA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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Prospects for the EPA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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In this Jan. 4, 2017, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator-designate Scott Pruitt answer a reporter's question during his meeting with Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., on Capitol Hill in Washington. When President-elect Donald Trump’s choice to head the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency first took office as Oklahoma’s attorney general, he disbanded the unit responsible for protecting the state’s natural resources. Instead, Pruitt reassigned his staff to focus on filing lawsuits against the federal agency he’s now selected to lead. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

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Illustration on the exoneration of fracking by the EPA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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Stacking the Deck at the EPA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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EPA Smog Test on Humans Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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Illustration on the untoward influence of the EPA on U.S. economic and energy policies by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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Illustration on EPA complicity in the Gold King toxic spill by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times