Environmental Protection Agency

Latest Environmental Protection Agency Items
  • Jeff Miller

    EDITORIAL: Another round for lead ammo

    Second Amendment foes have reloaded in another attempt to restrict Americans' use of firearms. Disguised as nature lovers, gun grabbers are repeating a demand that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ban the use of lead in ammunition. Forcing hunters to shell out for pricey substitutes is meant to discourage the sport and reduce gun ownership. Given the EPA's propensity for overregulation, Congress should step in and ensure this restriction never happens.


  • Illustration: EPA overreach by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

    KNIGHT: Taming the EPA monster

    Slowly, inexorably, the monster is being driven back to its lair. Its days of terrorizing villagers may soon be over. I wish I were talking about the federal government, but it's the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), better known as the Environmental Protection-or-else Agency.


  • New fuel efficient models help strengthen Toyota's industry

    As drivers endure the steady ascent of fuel prices nationally, Toyota, the most fuel-efficient full-line auto manufacturer in the United States, has strengthened its portfolio of efficient cars with five recently introduced vehicles that offer an average combined fuel economy of 44 mpg.


  • ** FILE ** In this Oct. 14, 2011, file photo, Mike and Chantell Sackett of Priest Lake, Idaho, pose for a photo in front of the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday that property owners have a right to prompt review by a judge of an important tool used by the Environmental Protection Agency to address water pollution. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File)

    Court backs Idaho couple in battle with EPA

    An Idaho couple facing ruinous fines for attempting to build a home on private property that the federal government considered protected wetlands may challenge an order from the Environmental Protection Agency, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday in a unanimous decision.


  • Illustration by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

    WATTS: Pipeline ruling filled with politics

    Four years ago, the State Department issued permits authorizing the construction of an oil pipeline that would cross our northern border on its way from Alberta, Canada, down to oil refineries in Texas. Along the way, this pipeline would snake through more than a half-dozen states, creating jobs and contributing to local tax bases. In fact, the pipeline would create tens of thousands of good-paying jobs, which are badly needed during this economic rut.


  • PACIFIC LEGAL FOUNDATION
Mike and Chantell Sackett have been fighting the EPA for four years over property they bought in Idaho that's been declared a wetland by the agency.

    EDITORIAL: Ending EPA's land grab

    Federal agencies are out of control. The grant of virtually unlimited power with no accountability has gone to the heads of some unelected bureaucrats, and nowhere is that more true than at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Even the Supreme Court has had enough. All nine justices agreed Wednesday that the agency has finally gone too far.


  • ** FILE ** In this Oct. 14, 2011, file photo, Mike and Chantell Sackett of Priest Lake, Idaho, pose for a photo in front of the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday that property owners have a right to prompt review by a judge of an important tool used by the Environmental Protection Agency to address water pollution. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File)

    Court sides with property owners over EPA

    The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that property owners have a right to prompt review by a judge of an important tool used by the Environmental Protection Agency to address water pollution.


  • TONELSON: Obama 'all-of-the-above' plan lacking in energy

    As gasoline prices drift higher, threatening economic growth, the White House excoriates Republicans for having no comprehensive energy plan while claiming to have an "all-of-the-above" plan of its own.


  • Rep. Andy Harris, Maryland Republican

    Natural gas industry high on future, despite current low prices

    Despite looming federal regulations and rock-bottom market prices, leaders in the natural gas business are confident the shale boom that's helped revitalize economies from Pennsylvania to Wyoming is only just getting started.


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