Topic - Eric Clapton

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  • Group hopes to build Oklahoma pop culture museum

    Jamie Oldaker toured the world drumming for the likes of Eric Clapton, among others, but he never lost touch with Oklahoma, where he honed the skills that enabled him to spend his life making music.

  • FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2010 file photo, Eric Clapton performs in concert at Madison Square Garden in New York. Clapton is paying tribute to his late friend and collaborator J.J. Cale with a new album.  Tom Petty, Willie Nelson, John Mayer and others lend a hand on "The Breeze: An Appreciation of J.J. Cale," due out July 29. The album includes 16 Cale songs reimagined by Clapton and the all-star group of friends. Cale, architect of the Tulsa Sound and a widely influential figure in rock 'n' roll history, died last year at 74. (AP Photo/Evan Agostini)

    Eric Clapton pays tribute to JJ Cale on new album

    Eric Clapton is paying tribute to his late friend and collaborator J.J. Cale with a new album.

  • Georgia luthier finds his calling in guitar work

    The first three songs Scott Dorscheimer ever learned on guitar were Bob Marley's "Redemption Song," Eric Clapton's "Layla" and The Allman Brothers' "Sweet Melissa."

  • Music Review: Eric Clapton's 'Old Sock' is cozy

    Eric Clapton, "Old Sock" (Bushbranch/Surfdog Records)

  • Artists complete concert for Sandy relief

    Musicians were so anxious to help out residents of the New York region hit by Superstorm Sandy, they almost didn't let their concert at Madison Square Garden end.

  • Eric Clapton's Richter sells for $34.2 million

    A Gerhard Richter painting owned by Eric Clapton has sold for 21.3 million pounds ($34.2 million), handily beating pre-sale estimates and setting a new auction record for the German abstract artist.

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'When I Left Home'

    Let us now praise Buddy Guy: six Grammy awards, Billboard magazine's Century Award, membership in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and the Blues Foundation's Keeping the Blues Alive Award. And he owns a Chicago blues club.

  • Bass player Donald 'Duck' Dunn dies in Tokyo at 70

    Donald "Duck" Dunn, the bassist who helped create the gritty Memphis soul sound at Stax Records in the 1960s as part of the legendary group Booker T. and the MGs and contributed to such classics as "In the Midnight Hour," "Hold On I'm Coming" and "Sitting on the Dock of the Bay," died Sunday at 70.

  • Bass player Donald 'Duck' Dunn dies in Tokyo

    Donald "Duck" Dunn, the bassist who helped create the gritty Memphis soul sound at Stax Records in the 1960s as part of the legendary group Booker T. and the MGs and contributed to such classics as "In the Midnight Hour," "Hold On I'm Coming" and "Sitting on the Dock of the Bay," died Sunday at 70.

  • Legendary bass player 'Duck' Dunn dies in Tokyo

    Donald "Duck" Dunn, the bassist who helped create the gritty Memphis soul sound at Stax Records in the 1960s as part of the legendary group Booker T. and the MGs and contributed to such classics as "In the Midnight Hour," "Hold On, I'm Coming" and "Sitting on the Dock of the Bay," died Sunday at 70.

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOGRAPHS
Steve LeVere, a blues historian and curator of the Robert Johnson centennial arts exhibit in Greenwood, Miss., talks about upcoming activities featuring local and nationally recognized blues musicians to celebrate Johnson's influence. "Of course, he died when he was 27," Mr. LeVere said. "He didn't give a whole lot of people much of a chance to get to know him,"

    Blues guitarist's legend lives long after his death

    When bluesman Robert Johnson died broke and all but unknown in a tiny Mississippi crossroads town, he was buried in a homemade coffin and an unmarked grave. Yet, a century after he came into this world, his eerie blues still influence artists from Eric Clapton to John Mayer, and his legacy continues to be celebrated.

  • Salutes mark bluesman Robert Johnson's centennial

    When bluesman Robert Johnson died broke and all but unknown in a tiny Mississippi crossroads town, he was buried in a homemade coffin and an unmarked grave. Yet, a century after he came into this world, his eerie blues still influence artists from Eric Clapton to John Mayer, and his legacy continues to be celebrated.

  • This Thursday, April 7, 2011 photo courtesy of Julie Skarratt shows, from left to right, Jazz at Lincoln Center Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis, musician Eric Clapton and blues legend Taj Mahal during Jazz at Lincoln Center's 2011 Annual Gala in New York. The organization raised more than $3.6 million dollars via the Gala, which will benefit the thousands of performance, education and broadcast events that the organization produces each year.   (AP Photo/Julie Skarratt)

    Eric Clapton jams in jazz set with Wynton Marsalis

    Eric Clapton fulfilled his childhood fantasy as he took a turn on the jazz side, collaborating with Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra for a little bit of swing at the orchestra's annual gala benefit.

  • Review: Robertson's return triumphant on new CD

    Robbie Robertson, "How to Become Clairvoyant" (429 Records)

  • FILE - In this  June 26, 2010 file photo, Eric Clapton performs during the Crossroads Guitar Festival in Chicago.  Eric Clapton is parting with dozens of guitars and amps at a New York City auction to benefit an alcohol and drug treatment center he founded in Antigua.  New York-Bonhams will offer the 70 guitars and 70 amps next Wednesday, March 9, 2011. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File)

    Eric Clapton guitars slated for NYC auction block

    Eric Clapton is parting with dozens of guitars and amps at a New York City auction to benefit an alcohol and drug treatment center he founded in Antigua.

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