European Union

Latest European Union Items
  • A Ukrainian Navy officer looks at the scuttled decommissioned Russian vessel "Ochakov" from the Black Sea shore outside the town of Myrnyi, western Crimea, Ukraine, Thursday, March 6, 2014.  In the early hours of Thursday Russian naval personnel scuttled the decommissioned ship, blockading access for five Ukrainian Naval vessels now trapped inside of the Southern Naval Headquarters located in Myrnyi in Western Crimea as Russian war vessels patrolled just of the coast. The vessel was brought by Russian naval forces on the 4th of March towed by a tug boat while escorted by a warship and several gun boats.  Marines from the Ukrainian navy heard a loud explosion in the early hours of last night coming from the vessel blocking a channel leading to the Black Sea.  (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

    Crimea to vote to split from Ukraine, join Russia

    Ukraine lurched toward breakup Thursday as lawmakers in Crimea unanimously declared they wanted to join Russia and would put the decision to voters in 10 days. President Barack Obama condemned the move and the West answered with the first real sanctions against Russia.


  • Putin uses carrot and stick to dominate neighbors

    As a counterweight to the European Union, Russia's Vladimir Putin is pursuing an ambitious dream rooted in memories of Soviet glory: The Eurasian Union.


  • White House to Putin: Allow international monitors in Crimea

    The Obama administration called on Russia on Wednesday to allow international monitors into the Crimean region of Ukraine, as the administration sought to broker a diplomatic solution to the tense standoff over the occupation by Russian troops.


  • Reagan administration warned Russian pipeline through Ukraine would weaken West

    In a memo to the White House in July 1981, advisers in the Ronald Reagan administration urged opposition to a new pipeline from Russia's oil- and gas-rich regions to Europe, warning that it would weaken the West's bargaining hand.


  • From left, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, French President Francois Hollande, Italian Foreign Minister Federica Mogherini and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, talk together during a break of a meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris, Wednesday, March 5, 2014. Top diplomats from the West and Russia trying to find an end to the crisis in Ukraine are gathering in Paris on Wednesday as tensions simmered over the Russian military takeover of the strategic Crimean Peninsula. (AP Photo/Alain Jocard, Pool)

    Russia, West try to hammer out Ukraine diplomacy

    Facing off in Europe's capitals Wednesday, Russia and the West began building the elements of a diplomatic solution to Europe's gravest crisis since the Cold War - even as the West appeared increasingly resigned to an entrenched Russian presence in Crimea. NATO hit back by putting Russia on suspension, and the European Union extended $15 billion in aid to Ukraine, matching the amount the country's fugitive president accepted from Moscow to turn his back on an EU trade accord.


  • President Barack Obama gestures as he answers a question regarding the ongoing situation in the Ukraine, during his meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Monday, March 3, 2014, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

    Obama warns U.S. may retaliate against Russia with economic sanctions

    President Obama warned Russia on Monday of possible U.S. sanctions over its military land grab in Ukraine, but Moscow brushed aside international threats, tightening its stranglehold on Crimea and calling audaciously for a national unity government in Kiev.


  • Unidentified gunmen stand outside entrance to the General Staff Headquarters of the Ukrainian Navy in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Monday, March 3, 2014. Pro-Russian soldiers seem to further cement their control over the strategic region, that also houses the Russian Black Sea Fleet, by seizing a ferry terminal in the Ukrainian city of Kerch about 20 kilometers (12 miles) by boat to Russia, intensifying fears that Moscow will send even more troops into the peninsula.  (AP Photo/Andrew Lubimov)

    Russia sets Ukraine agenda with diplomacy, threats

    Russian troops said to be 16,000 strong tightened their stranglehold on Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula Monday, openly defying the U.S. and the European Union and rattling world capitals and stock markets.


  • AP News in Brief at 5:58 a.m. EST

    Pro-Russian leader of Ukraine's Crimea claims control of military, police; asks Putin for help


  • ** FILE ** In this Tuesday Dec. 17, 2013, file photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, and his Ukrainian counterpart Viktor Yanukovych talk during a news conference in Moscow. Moscow on Wednesday granted Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych protection "on the territory of Russia," shortly after the fugitive leader sought help from the Kremlin, according to an official quoted by Russian news agencies. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev, file)

    Russia reportedly sheltering Ukraine's president

    Russia sent fighter jets to patrol the border with Ukraine, reportedly gave shelter to the country's fugitive president and pro-Russian gunmen stormed offices of a strategic region, deepening the crisis for Ukraine's new government even as it was being formed.


Happening Now