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britain-faberge-eggjpeg-036bb_mugshot_four_by_three.jpg

A jeweler's employee holding a Faberge Egg, one of the eight missing Faberge imperial eggs that was found at a flea market in the American Midwest, poses for photographers in central London, Monday, April 7, 2014. It was originally given by Tsar Alexander III to his wife Empress Maria Feodorovna for Easter 1887. A London antique dealer said that a scrap metal entrepreneur bought the egg for about 14,000 US dollars, thinking he could make a small profit by reselling the piece for its gold content. It turned out the jewel-encrusted piece was worth millions. Both buyer and seller want to remain anonymous, and did not disclose the sale price — but experts note that a non-imperial Faberge egg sold at Christie's for 18.5 million US dollars in 2007. Only 50 of the imperial eggs were made for the royal family, and eight remained missing before the latest find, though only three of those are known to have survived the Russian revolution. It will be on display at Wartski's London showroom April 14-17, the first time it will have been seen in public for 112 years. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

Britain Faberge Egg.JPEG-036bb.jpg

Britain Faberge Egg.JPEG-036bb.jpg

A jeweler's employee holding a Faberge Egg, one of the eight missing Faberge imperial eggs that was found at a flea market in the American Midwest, poses for photographers in central London, Monday, April 7, 2014. It was originally given by Tsar Alexander III to his wife Empress Maria Feodorovna for Easter 1887. A London antique dealer said that a scrap metal entrepreneur bought the egg for about 14,000 US dollars, thinking he could make a small profit by reselling the piece for its gold content. It turned out the jewel-encrusted piece was worth millions. Both buyer and seller want to remain anonymous, and did not disclose the sale price — but experts note that a non-imperial Faberge egg sold at Christie's for 18.5 million US dollars in 2007. Only 50 of the imperial eggs were made for the royal family, and eight remained missing before the latest find, though only three of those are known to have survived the Russian revolution. It will be on display at Wartski's London showroom April 14-17, the first time it will have been seen in public for 112 years. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

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20120329-172833-pic-463347880.jpg

Festival: Faberge Egg Festival Last year, parents in Colorado Springs invaded the city's annual Easter egg hunt, ruining everything and leading organizers to cancel this year's event. The reason for the interference, said one parent, was simple: "I promised my kid an Easter egg hunt and I'd want to give him an even edge." Clearly, the true meaning of Easter has gone by the wayside. Assuming you want your children to know the true meaning of Easter, get them to a church. If you're fine with maintaining the charming egg association, but want to avoid awakening your worst helicopter-parent instincts, take your children to Hillwood's Faberge Egg Family Festival. There they can paint eggs in grand Faberge style, listen to storyteller Arianna Ross divulge the egg's aristocratic history, play Russian folk games, listen to Russian folk music, and meet a Tsar Nicholas II impersonator. To April 1 at the Hillwood Museum, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. Phone: 202/686.5807. Web: http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org/

Travel Trip Faberge R1_Reps.jpg

Travel Trip Faberge R1_Reps.jpg

This undated image provided by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts shows a Faberge 1912 gold-and-lapis lazuli Imperial Tsesarevich Easter Egg which is part of an exhibit titled "Faberge Revealed" at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Va. (AP Photo/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts)

Travel Trip Faberge R_Reps.jpg

Travel Trip Faberge R_Reps.jpg

This undated image provided by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts shows a Faberge Imperial Lilies of the Valley Basket, 1896, which is part of an exhibit titled "Faberge Revealed" at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Va. (AP Photo/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts)