Topic - Federal Aviation Administration

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    The Federal Aviation Administration says Hawaiian Airlines went eight years without properly inspecting certain components of one of its planes used for commercial flights.

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    Officials want to transfer Terre Haute airport property to the Indiana highway department to help create a new entrance to an Air National Guard base.

  • Pilot killed in Central California plane crash

    Officials say a pilot has been killed after a small plane crashed at the foot of the Sierra Nevada mountains in Central California.

  • In this photo taken on April 8, 2014, Tim Miller, left, EquuSearch founder, and volunteer Gene Robinson, who builds the group's drones, launch a drone in Santa Fe, Texas. The group relies mostly on horseback and all-terrain vehicles to search rough terrain. But it also employs 4-pound aerial drones to survey the ground with digital cameras. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Mayra Beltran) MANDATORY CREDIT

    Search teams that rely on drones run afoul of FAA

    Texas EquuSearch volunteers are gearing up for their next search, this time for a 31-year-old man who went missing more than a week ago in rural Louisiana. But if they use drones to help out, they could run afoul of the federal government.

  • At least 2 compete on satellite plane tracking

    A small Louisiana company says it's working toward federal approval of satellite GPS technology to provide second-by-second tracking of airplanes anywhere in the world.

  • FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2014 file photo, Federal Aviation Administration Administrator Michael Huerta testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Huerta is scheduled to visit Grand Forks, N.D., April 21, 2014, to review North Dakota's growing unmanned aircraft industry. He will then go to Williston to get a firsthand look at airport infrastructure needs in the western oil patch, according to the state's congressional delegation. The FAA late last year named North Dakota as one of six states that will be test sites for integrating drones into civilian airspace. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    Heads of FAA, Transportation coming to ND in April

    The heads of the Federal Aviation Administration and the federal Transportation Department are scheduled to come to North Dakota next month.

  • Plane wreckage found along Georgia coast

    U.S. Coast Guard crews and others searching Tuesday for two people who were aboard a small plane that went missing near Georgia's coastline found debris suspected to be pieces of the plane's battery and luggage in a marshy area.

  • Pilots' mental health a concern amid jet mystery

    Reinforced doors with keypad entries. Body scanners and pat-downs. Elaborate crew maneuvers when a pilot has to use the restroom. All those tactics are designed to keep dangerous people out of the cockpit. But what if the pilot is the problem?

  • Airport may harness the sun for power

    The sweeping curves and glass walls of Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport's planned new terminal building have defined that project since the design was released last month, but the futuristic architecture is not the only forward-looking aspect of the project.

  • EAA, FAA reach settlement over AirVenture fees

    The Experimental Aircraft Association has reached an agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration over air traffic control fees during its annual convention, the EAA said Friday.

  • FAA says Boeing 787's design, manufacture safe

    Boeing's design and manufacture of its cutting-edge 787 jetliner is safe despite the many problems encountered since the plane's rollout, including a fire that forced a redesign of the its batteries, according to a report issued jointly Wednesday by the Federal Aviation Administration and the aircraft maker.

  • Charlotte Douglas airport reopens 4th runway

    Charlotte Douglas International Airport has reopened its fourth runway after a review ordered by the Federal Aviation Administration.

  • Delta flight loses piece of wing, lands safely

    A Delta flight from Orlando, Fla., landed safely in Atlanta after declaring an emergency because a part of the plane's wing was missing.

  • FILE - This March 12, 2014 file photo shows a drone landing after flying over the scene of an explosion that leveled two apartment buildings in East Harlem in New York. Brian Wilson, the owner, says he uses the aerial drone to document buildings, weddings and news events. The Federal Aviation Administration bars commercial use of drones no matter how seemingly benign. Officials say rules to address the special safety challenges associated with unmanned aircraft need to be in place before they can share the sky with manned aircraft and final regulations could be years away. But tempting technology and an eager marketplace are outrunning the aviation agency's best intentions. Photographers, real estate agents, moviemakers, and others are hurrying to embrace the technology. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    US lags as commercial drones take off around globe

    A small, four-rotor drone hovered over Washington Nationals players for a few days during spring training in Florida last month, taking publicity photos impossible for a human photographer to capture. But no one got the Federal Aviation Administration's permission first.

  • FILE - This March 12, 2014 file photo shows a drone landing after flying over the scene of an explosion that leveled two apartment buildings in East Harlem in New York. Brian Wilson, the owner, says he uses the aerial drone to document buildings, weddings and news events. The Federal Aviation Administration bars commercial use of drones no matter how seemingly benign. Officials say rules to address the special safety challenges associated with unmanned aircraft need to be in place before they can share the sky with manned aircraft and final regulations could be years away. But tempting technology and an eager marketplace are outrunning the aviation agency's best intentions. Photographers, real estate agents, moviemakers, and others are hurrying to embrace the technology. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    US lags as commercial drones take off around globe

    A small, four-rotor drone hovered over Washington Nationals players for a few days during spring training in Florida last month, taking publicity photos impossible for a human photographer to capture. But no one got the Federal Aviation Administration's permission first.

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