Federal Aviation Administration

Latest Federal Aviation Administration Items
  • In this Aug. 28, 2010 photo, pilot Martha King steps out of a Cessna with her hands raised on the orders of police in Santa Barbara, Calif., as the plane was flagged as stolen by an aviation security computer system but the plane was actually owned by the pilots, two of the most famous aviation figures in the United States, John and Martha King. The Federal Aviation Administration's aircraft registry is missing key information on who owns about a third of the private and commercial planes in the U.S., a gap the agency fears could be exploited by terrorists and drug traffickers. (AP Photo/Santa Barbara News-Press, Robby Barthelmess)

    FAA loses track of 119,000 aircraft

    The Federal Aviation Administration is missing key information on who owns one-third of the 357,000 private and commercial aircraft in the U.S. — a gap the agency fears could be exploited by terrorists and drug traffickers.


  • FAA returns Mexico to top aviation rating

    Mexico's top aviation safety rating has been restored because its airline oversight has improved, U.S. aviation officials said Wednesday.


  • Wreckage from the Maryland State Police medevac helicopter crash that killed four people is scattered on one side in Walter Mill Regional Park in District Heights in September 2008.

    FAA proposes new rules for helicopter safety

    The Federal Aviation Administration on Thursday proposed stricter flight rules for helicopters, including many to increase safety for medical helicopters after a recent spike in fatal accidents.


  • Errant drone near DC almost met by fighter jets

    The U.S. military almost launched fighter jets and discussed a possible shoot-down when an errant Navy drone briefly veered into restricted airspace near the nation's capital last month, a senior military official said Thursday.


  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
After a regional airliner crashed in western New York in February 2009, killing 50 people, Obama administration officials vowed to take swift action to prevent similar tragedies. High on their list: new rules governing the hours pilots may work, to prevent tired flight crews from making fatal errors.

    New FAA rules on pilot fatigue are ready

    After a regional airliner crashed in western New York a year and a half ago, killing 50 people, the Obama administration promised swift action to prevent similar tragedies. High on the list: new rules governing the number of hours pilots may work in order to prevent tired flight crews from making fatal errors.


  • A worker carries a piece of wreckage as federal investigators and local officials scour Holy Cross Cemetery in Butte, Mont., in March 2009 after a small plane crashed there, leaving 14 dead. (Associated Press)

    Montana plane crash refuels tot lap-seat debate

    Federal transportation safety officials are using the deadly crash of an overloaded plane in Montana to revive a long-standing debate about whether small children should be allowed to travel on the laps of adults.


  • An American Airlines Boeing 757 jet takes off from Miami International Airport in Miami on Wednesday, Aug. 18, 2010. Federal officials have hit the airline with a record penalty of $24.2 million over maintenance lapses that caused thousands of canceled flights in 2008. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    FAA hits American Airlines with $24.2M penalty

    Federal officials are seeking a record penalty of $24.2 million against American Airlines over maintenance lapses that caused thousands of canceled flights in 2008.


  • In this photo taken June 16, 2010, John Kausner of Clarence Center, N.Y., left, who's 24-year-old daughter Ellyce died in the crash of Continental Connection Flight 3407 in Feb. 2009, talks to Jeffrey Smisek, right, Continental Airlines President and CEO, to request his support for new airline safety provisions outside a congressional committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Congress is on the verge of passing far-reaching airline safety legislation, and a lot of the credit goes to the families and friends of the 50 people died in the Flight 3407 crash more than a year ago. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari)

    Congress ready to pass aviation safety measures

    The chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee said he is introducing a bill that would tighten measures for airlines after a deadly commuter plane crash in western New York in early 2009.


  • Crash of experimental plane kills 2 in western Pa.


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