Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation

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  • Sen. Mike Crapo (right), Idaho Republican, confers with Sen. Rand Paul, Kentucky Republican. He aims to revamp a $10 trillion mortgage market, the largest piece of unfinished business from the 2008 credit crisis. (Associated press)

    GOP: Finding the middle ground

    Sen. Mike Crapo, Idaho Republican, has been in a yearlong tug of war to revamp the nation’s $10 trillion mortgage market.


  • **FILE** Rep. Melvin Watt of North Carolina addresses the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., on Sept. 6, 2012. (Associated Press)

    S&P: Fannie, Freddie needed to sustain housing rebound

    Standard & Poor's Corp., one of Wall Street's top credit agencies, said Tuesday that the fragile housing recovery cannot continue without support from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two mortgage finance giants many in Congress seem bent on eliminating.


  • South Carolina editorial roundup

    Recent editorials from South Carolina newspapers:


  • Coakley threatens to sue federal housing agency

    Attorney General Martha Coakley is threatening to sue the Federal Housing Finance Agency for refusing to comply with a state law designed to help stem foreclosures.


  • FILE - This Monday, Aug. 8, 2011 file photo shows the Fannie Mae headquarters in Washington. Fannie Mae reports quarterly results for the January-March 2014 quarter on Thursday, May 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

    Fannie, Freddie post solid earnings for 1Q

    Government-controlled mortgage financers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac posted solid earnings for the January-March period as the U.S. housing market continued to recover. Gains over recent quarters have enabled the companies to fully repay their taxpayer aid after being rescued by the government in 2008.


  • FILE - In this Tuesday, April 9, 2013 file photo, a "Sold" sign is posted outside a home in Indianapolis. Mortgage giant Freddie Mac reports quarterly results for the January-March 2014 quarter on Thursday, May 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy, File)

    Freddie Mac posts $4B profit in 1Q

    Mortgage giant Freddie Mac posted net income of $4 billion for the January-through-March period, helped by a strengthening housing market. The government-controlled company has turned a profit in each of the past 10 quarters.


  • The Senate Banking Committee this month is expected to mark up the bipartisan bill drafted last month by Chairman Tim Johnson, South Dakota Democrat (left), and the committee's ranking minority member, Sen. Mike Crapo, Idaho Republican (right), The bill would phase out Fannie and Freddie while setting up a new agency to offer a much more limited government guarantee on securities backed by prime mortgages. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

    EDITORIAL: Johnson-Crapo is Obamacare for homebuilders

    Nationalizing health care, which represents one-sixth of the economy, has been nothing short of a disaster. The Senate will vote Tuesday to establish a permanent federal presence in housing, which represents another one-sixth of the economy.


  • The Senate Banking Committee this month is expected to mark up the bipartisan bill drafted last month by Chairman Tim Johnson, South Dakota Democrat (left), and the committee's ranking minority member, Sen. Mike Crapo, Idaho Republican (right), The bill would phase out Fannie and Freddie while setting up a new agency to offer a much more limited government guarantee on securities backed by prime mortgages. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

    Stalemate on the Hill may spare Fannie and Freddie from reform

    Stepped-up demands from liberal Democrats and conservative Republicans are threatening the prospects for legislation to revive and reform the private mortgage market, six years after it collapsed and largely disappeared during the Great Recession.


  • ** FILE ** In this Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, photo, a Bank of America sign is displayed in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

    Bank of America to pay $9.3B to make federal dispute go away

    Bank of America agreed to pay $9.33 billion to put to rest a long-running mortgage securities dispute with the Federal Housing Finance Agency, which accused the lender of falsely representing loans that went south when the housing bubble burst.


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