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Vice President Joseph R. Biden (left) and Secretary of State John Kerry unveil the FIFA World Cup trophy, the actual trophy that will be awarded to the winner of this year’s World Cup soccer tournament in Brazil, during a ceremony at the State Department in Washington on April 14, 2014. (Associated Press)

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AP861085868149.jpg

Vice President Joseph R. Biden (left) and Secretary of State John Kerry unveil the FIFA World Cup trophy, the actual trophy that will be awarded to the winner of this year’s World Cup soccer tournament in Brazil, during a ceremony at the State Department in Washington on April 14, 2014. (Associated Press)

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FILE - A Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2009 photo from files showing the shadow of Australian John Fahey, President of the World Anti-Doping Agency, WADA, during a WADA Media Symposium at the Olympic Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland. FIFA’s medical chief, Michel D’Hooghe, says he is “really not happy” with drug-testing plans for the World Cup in Brazil, because samples taken from players must be flown across the Atlantic to a laboratory in Switzerland for analysis, possibly slowing results. FIFA had to turn to the lab in Lausanne because the Brazilian facility that was expected to analyze World Cup samples repeatedly failed to comply with World Anti-Doping Agency standards and so lost its authority to do testing.(AP Photo/Keystone, Laurent Gillieron, File)

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FILE - An Aug. 3, 2004 photo from files showing an unidentified laboratory assistant looking at a blood test at the WADA laboratories in Lausanne, Switzerland. FIFA’s medical chief, Michel D’Hooghe, says he is “really not happy” with drug-testing plans for the World Cup in Brazil, because samples taken from players must be flown across the Atlantic to a laboratory in Switzerland for analysis, possibly slowing results. FIFA had to turn to the lab in Lausanne because the Brazilian facility that was expected to analyze World Cup samples repeatedly failed to comply with World Anti-Doping Agency standards and so lost its authority to do testing.(AP Photo/Keystone, Fabrice Coffrini), File)

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FILE - An Aug. 3, 2004 photo from files showing an unidentified laboratory assistant looking at urine tests at the WADA laboratories in Lausanne, Switzerland. FIFA’s medical chief, Michel D’Hooghe, says he is “really not happy” with drug-testing plans for the World Cup in Brazil, because samples taken from players must be flown across the Atlantic to a laboratory in Switzerland for analysis, possibly slowing results. FIFA had to turn to the lab in Lausanne because the Brazilian facility that was expected to analyze World Cup samples repeatedly failed to comply with World Anti-Doping Agency standards and so lost its authority to do testing.(AP Photo/Keystone, Fabrice Coffrini), File)