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20110714-211014-pic-892877198.jpg

FLAG DAY: Volunteer New York City firefighters stand watch over the National 9/11 Flag on display Thursday at the Russell Senate Office Building. Gallery, www.washingtontimes.com/multimedia/collection. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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U.S. Navy sailor EM2 Hanlin Edwin, originally from Micronesia but now living in Washington, D.C., looks at his new certificate of naturalization as an on-looker claps after he and 20 others became naturalized U.S. citizens on Flag Day, Tuesday, June 14, 2011 at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. Edwin was one of four new citizens who have already been serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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One of the 20 newly naturalized U.S. citizens holds onto his U.S. Citizenshp package and the program for the naturalization ceremony, held Flag Day, Tuesday, June 14, 2011 at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. Twenty people from 12 different countries became U.S. citizens during the ceremony. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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From left, Sr. Airman Deborah Vives, USAF, originally from Mexico, U.S. Army Sgt. Kelvin Magana, originally from El Salvador, and U.S. Navy sailor Hanlin Edwin, originally from Micronesia, take their oaths of citizenship on Flag Day, Tuesday, June 14, 2011 at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. Twenty people from 12 different countries become naturalized American citizens during the ceremony. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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U.S. Army Sgt. Kelvin Magana, originally from El Salvador but now living in Manassas, Va.,id lost in thought after becoming a naturalized American citizen on Flag Day, Tuesday, June 14, 2011 at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. Twenty people from 12 different countries, including four people serving in the U.S. Armed Forces, became citizens during the ceremony. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)