Francis George - Bio, News, Photos - Washington Times
Skip to content

Francis George

Latest Stories

Obit Cardinal George.JPEG-0768e.jpg

Obit Cardinal George.JPEG-0768e.jpg

FILE - In this March 14, 2013 file photo, Cardinal Francis George speaks during an interview at the North American College in Rome. George, a vigorous defender of Roman Catholic orthodoxy who led the U.S. bishops' fight against Obamacare and played a key role in the church's response to the clergy sex abuse scandal, has died. He was 78. George, who retired as Chicago archbishop in the fall of 2014, died Friday morning, April 17, 2015, after a long fight with cancer, according to the Archdiocese of Chicago. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

2b6ceefbdb47d00a4e0f6a706700a359.jpg

2b6ceefbdb47d00a4e0f6a706700a359.jpg

FILE - In this March 14, 2013 file photo, Cardinal Francis George speaks during an interview at the North American College in Rome. A spokesperson for the Chicago Archdiocese said Tuesday, March 18, 2014, that Cardinal Francis George is expected to be released from a hospital later this week after treatment for dehydration and flu-like symptoms. The 77-year-old spiritual leader recently started another round of chemotherapy to address signs of cancer returning to the area around his right kidney. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

dcef3d744ed3c8094d0f6a706700b72e.jpg

dcef3d744ed3c8094d0f6a706700b72e.jpg

FILE - In this March 14, 2013 file photo, Cardinal Francis George speaks during an interview at the North American College in Rome. On Friday, March 7, 2014, the Archdiocese of Chicago announced that George is starting another round of chemotherapy to address signs of cancer returning to the area around his right kidney. He was diagnosed with cancer in August 2012 and had chemotherapy then. The diocese says the cancer was dormant for more than a year. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

439e3f653d4369044a0f6a706700f900.jpg

439e3f653d4369044a0f6a706700f900.jpg

In this Thursday, March 14, 2013 photo, U.S. Cardinal Francis George speaks during an interview at the North American College in Rome. When he turned 75, Cardinal Francis George of Chicago did what the church expects of an archbishop. He submitted his resignation so the pope could decide how much longer the cardinal could serve. But two years and one stunning papal retirement later, the decision now belongs to Pope Francis, in what will be his first major appointment in the United States. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

7698ed44f8678f02490f6a706700d72e.jpg

7698ed44f8678f02490f6a706700d72e.jpg

FILE - In this March 14, 2013, file photo, Chicago Cardinal Francis George speaks during an interview with the Associated Press in Rome, Italy. The Archdiocese of Chicago spent decades covering up the sexual abuse of children according to documents released by Church officials last week and being made public on Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014, by victims’ attorneys. George, who has led the archdiocese since 1997, released a letter to parishioners on Jan. 12 in which he apologized for the abuse and said releasing the records "raises transparency to a new level." He also stressed that much of the abuse occurred decades ago, before he became archbishop. He said all of the incidents eventually were reported to civil authorities and resulted in settlements with victims. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

337de910f61d8502490f6a706700c4e9.jpg

337de910f61d8502490f6a706700c4e9.jpg

FILE - In this March 14, 2013, file photo, Chicago Cardinal Francis George speaks during an interview with the Associated Press in Rome, Italy. Internal documents showing how officials from the Archdiocese of Chicago handled allegations of child sexual abuse by priests are about to become public when victims’ attorneys post the documents to a website Tuesday morning, Jan. 21, 2014, after receiving them from the archdiocese last week as part of legal settlements. The documents are for 30 of 65 priests for whom the archdiocese says it has credible allegations. George says the disclosures are an attempt at transparency and to help victims heal. He’s also apologized to victims and area Catholics for the abuse. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

20101115-194042-pic-346509099.jpg

20101115-194042-pic-346509099.jpg

Associated Press Catholic Cardinal Francis George, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, in Baltimore reiterated his warnings Monday that the new health care law will allow indirect subsidies for abortion.