Topic - Fredric Horowitz

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  • FILE - This Oct. 1, 2013 file photo shows New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez arrivng at the offices of Major League Baseball in New York. Rodriguez sued Major League Baseball and its players' union Monday, Jan. 13, 2014 seeking to overturn a season-long suspension imposed by an arbitrator who ruled there was "clear and convincing evidence" he used three banned substances and twice tried to obstruct the sport's drug investigation. (AP Photo/David Karp, file)

    Alex Rodriguez withdraws lawsuit against MLB, will sit out 2014

    Rodriguez was suspended for 211 games last Aug. 5 for violations of baseball's drug agreement and labor contract, and arbitrator Fredric Horowitz cut the penalty on Jan. 11 to 162 games plus the 2014 postseason. Rodriguez sued two days later.

  • FILE- In this Sept. 30, 2013 file photo, Alex Rodriguez leaves the offices of Major League Baseball in New York. Rodriguez has accepted his season-long suspension from Major League Baseball, the longest penalty in the sport's history related to performance-enhancing drugs. Rodriguez withdrew his lawsuits against Major League Baseball, Commissioner Bud Selig and the players' association to overturn his season-long suspension on Friday, Feb. 7, 2014. The notices of dismissal were filed in federal court in Manhattan. (AP Photo/David Karp, File)

    Rodriguez accepts season-long suspension

    Alex Rodriguez ended his extended and acrimonious fight with Major League Baseball on Friday, withdrawing a pair of lawsuits and accepting a season-long suspension that marks the longest penalty in the sport's history related to performance-enhancing drugs.

  • Steinbrenner: Rodriguez 'obviously an asset'

    Hal Steinbrenner says Alex Rodriguez is "a great player" and "obviously an asset," but the New York Yankees' managing general partner wouldn't discuss the third baseman's possible return to the team following a season-long suspension.

  • FILE - This Oct. 1, 2013 file photo shows New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez arrivng at the offices of Major League Baseball in New York. Rodriguez sued Major League Baseball and its players' union Monday, Jan. 13, 2014 seeking to overturn a season-long suspension imposed by an arbitrator who ruled there was "clear and convincing evidence" he used three banned substances and twice tried to obstruct the sport's drug investigation. (AP Photo/David Karp, file)

    5 things to know about Alex Rodriguez's lawsuit

    Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez sued Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association in an effort to overturn the season-long drug suspension imposed last weekend by arbitrator Fredric Horowitz. Here are five things to know about the complaint filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Manhattan:

  • FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2013 file photo, New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez heads to the dugout during the Yankees 5-1 loss to the Boston Red Sox  in a baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston.  Rodriguez's drug suspension has been cut to 162 games from 211 by arbitrator Fredric Horowitz, a decision sidelining the New York Yankees third baseman the entire 2014 season.  (AP Photo/Winslow Townson)

    Alex Rodriguez sues MLB, players' union to overturn suspension

    Alex Rodriguez has sued Major League Baseball and its players' union, seeking to overturn a season-long suspension imposed by an arbitrator who ruled there was "clear and convincing evidence" he used three banned substances and twice tried to obstruct the sport's drug investigation.

  • FILE - This Oct. 1, 2013 file photo shows New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez arrivng at the offices of Major League Baseball in New York. Rodriguez sued Major League Baseball and its players' union Monday, Jan. 13, 2014 seeking to overturn a season-long suspension imposed by an arbitrator who ruled there was "clear and convincing evidence" he used three banned substances and twice tried to obstruct the sport's drug investigation. (AP Photo/David Karp, file)

    A-Rod sues MLB, union to overturn drug ban

    Alex Rodriguez sued Major League Baseball and its players' union Monday, seeking to overturn a season-long suspension imposed by an arbitrator who ruled there was "clear and convincing evidence" the New York Yankees star used three banned substances and twice tried to obstruct the sport's drug investigation.

  • FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2013 file photo, New York Yankees Alex Rodriguez reacts after striking out in the second inning of the second game of a baseball doubleheader at Yankee Stadium in New York. Rodriguez's drug suspension has been cut to 162 games from 211 by arbitrator Fredric Horowitz, a decision sidelining the New York Yankees third baseman the entire 2014 season.  (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

    A-Rod suspension cut to 162 games by arbitrator

    Rodriguez also would be sidelined for any postseason games this year under the ruling announced Saturday, which costs him $25 million of the $86 million remaining on his contract.

  • FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2013 file photo, New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez throws Boston Red Sox runner Dustin Pedroia during the fifth inning of a baseball game  at Yankee Stadium in New York.  Rodriguez's drug suspension has been cut to 162 games from 211 by arbitrator Fredric Horowitz, a decision sidelining the New York Yankees third baseman the entire 2014 season.  (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)

    5 things to know about Alex Rodriguez's drug ban

    Arbitrator Fredric Horowitz reduced Alex Rodriguez's 211-game suspension, which was announced last Aug. 5 by baseball Commissioner Bud Selig, to 162 games and any postseason games the New York Yankees play this year. Here are five things to know about the decision Saturday:

  • A-Rod banned for 2014 season, arbitrator rules

    Alex Rodriguez was dealt the most severe punishment in the history of baseball's drug agreement when an arbitrator ruled the New York Yankees third baseman is suspended for the entire 2014 season as a result of a drug investigation by Major League Baseball.

  • In revised suit, A-Rod accuses Selig of cowardice

    Alex Rodriguez's lawyers updated his lawsuit against Major League Baseball and Bud Selig, adding new criticism of the commissioner for not testifying in the union's grievance to overturn the 211-game suspension given to the New York Yankees star last summer.

  • A-Rod, MLB await decision, expected in January

    Now the waiting begins for Alex Rodriguez and Major League Baseball.

  • Hearing over; A-Rod decision likely in January

    Alex Rodriguez's grievance hearing to overturn his 211-game suspension ended Thursday when both sides rested their cases, a day after the New York Yankees third baseman angrily walked out and decided not to testify in his own defense.

  • AP source: A-Rod grievance hearing completed

    Alex Rodriguez's grievance hearing to overturn his 211-game suspension ended Thursday after 12 days of sessions, a day after the New York Yankees third baseman angrily walked out and decided not to testify in his own defense.

  • A-Rod walks out of his own grievance

    Alex Rodriguez's lawyers were back at his arbitration hearing without him Thursday, a day after he added a different kind of walk-off to go along with the 11 game-ending hits in his big league career.

  • Alex Rodriguez signs autographs as he arrives at Major League Baseball headquarters in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013. Rodriguez's grievance hearing to overturn his 211-game suspension resumed Monday with the first of what could be 10 straight days of sessions. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    A-Rod grievance hearing ends after 12 contentious sessions

    Major League Baseball has started its rebuttal. Rodriguez's team is still to make its rebuttal. After the hearing concludes, the sides would set a schedule for briefs. The matter would then be turned over to arbitrator Fredric Horowitz for a decision.

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Quotations
  • "Direct evidence of those violations was supplied by the testimony of Anthony Bosch and corroborated with excerpts from Bosch's personal composition notebooks, BBMs (Blackberry messages) exchanged between Bosch and Rodriguez, and reasonable inferences drawn from the entire record of evidence," Horowitz wrote. "The testimony was direct, credible and squarely corroborated by excerpts from several of the hundreds of pages of his composition notebooks."

    A-Rod sues MLB, union to overturn drug ban →

  • Horowitz wrote MLB was justified in citing violations of the collective bargaining agreement because Rodriguez "played an active role in inducing Bosch to issue his own public denial on Jan. 29" and "attempted to induce Bosch to sign a sworn statement on May 31" saying he never supplied the player.

    A-Rod sues MLB, union to overturn drug ban →

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