Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Plant

Latest Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Plant Items
  • Toshiba shows four-legged robot for nuke disaster

    Toshiba Corp. unveiled a robot Wednesday that the company says can withstand high radiation and help in nuclear disasters. But it remains unclear what exactly the new machine will be capable of doing if and when it gets the go-ahead to enter Japan's crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant.


  • Toshiba shows off robot meant to help at nuke site

    Toshiba Corp. has developed a robot it says can withstand high radiation to work in nuclear disasters, but it's not clear what exactly the robot is capable of doing if and when it gets the go-ahead to enter Japan's crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant.


  • **FILE** Smoke rises March 15, 2011, from the badly damaged Unit 3 reactor (left), next to the Unit 4 reactor covered by an outer wall at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex in Okuma, Japan. The emergency command center at Japan's stricken nuclear plant shook violently when hydrogen exploded at Unit 3 and the plant chief reacted by shouting, "This is serious, this is serious," reveal videos of the crisis as it happened. (Associated Press/Tokyo Electric Power Co., File)

    Nuke plant chief after tsunami: 'This is serious'

    The emergency command center at Japan's stricken nuclear plant shook violently when hydrogen exploded at one reactor and the plant chief reacted by shouting, "This is serious, this is serious," reveal videos of the crisis as it happened last year.


  • ** FILE ** In this May 31, 2011, photo released Saturday, June 4, 2011, by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), a worker climbs scaffoldings set up around the decontamination device, having functions of nuclide adsorption and coagulation settling in the newly built radioactive water processing facilities at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.)

    Water cleanup system shut down at Japan nuke plant

    A system to clean massive amounts of contaminated water at the site of Japan's nuclear disaster was shut down Saturday, just hours after it began full operations, because a component filled with radioactivity much more quickly than expected.


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