Gamal Abdel Nasser

Latest Gamal Abdel Nasser Items
  • Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and other supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi protest near Cairo University on Sunday as tensions mount between Islamists and the U.S.-backed secular military. (Associated Press)

    Ouster of Egypt's Islamist president a product of army's U.S. military training

    In ousting Muslim Brotherhood rule, the Egyptian army did what it has been taught to do for decades: Keep Cairo out of the hands of Islamists.


  • **FILE** Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (center) and his sons, Alaa (left) and Gamal, are seen behind bars during a Aug. 15, 2011, court hearing in Cairo. (Associated Press)

    Mubarak's sons to be tried for insider trading

    Hosni Mubarak's two sons were charged Wednesday with insider trading and referred to trial before a criminal court.


  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Israel entered Suez War for several reasons

    I have two clarifications to John R. Coyne Jr.'s interesting and timely book review ("How Ike eased Middle East strife," March 29).


  • Illustration by Clement, National Post, Toronto, Canada

    MACGREGOR: Obama and Eden, kindred connivers

    In 1956, Britain's Prime Minister, Sir Anthony Eden, saw Egypt's new president, Gamal Abdel Nasser, as a fascist riding a dangerous new wave of Arab nationalism. When Nasser seized control of the Suez Canal from its British and French owners, Eden was sure Nasser was an Arab Hitler and rejected any alternative to direct military action as "appeasement." Guy Mollet, the French premier at the time, shared Eden's opinion and joined with Britain and Israel in the attack on Egypt to remove Nasser.


  • SANDERS: Crises — but which is the one?

    Those of us who lived through long decades of the Cold War can look back to mistaken views of a world scene played out on many stages. Then, as now, drama tended to overshadow more important currents.


  • UNDER PRESSURE: Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak tells his people Tuesday he will not seek re-election. (Associated Press)

    DE BORCHGRAVE: The Mubarak legend

    President Hosni Mubarak has been at the top or near the top of the Egyptian pyramid since 1975, when he was appointed vice president by his friend and mentor, President Anwar Sadat. A fighter pilot, he was trained at the Soviet Air Force Academy at Bishkek in then-Soviet Kyrgyzstan. As chief of staff of the Egyptian Air Force in 1971, he bluffed his Soviet air force advisers into a humiliating defeat.


  • Illustration: Yemen

    DE BORCHGRAVE: Al Qaeda oasis in Yemen

    Some of al Qaeda's most effective operators, armed with its most lethal weapons, are based in Yemen, a failing state in the southwestern corner of the Arabian Peninsula, where most people believe the world's most dangerous terrorist movement is a figment of U.S. propaganda. No one knows Yemen better than Saudi Arabia's intelligence service. Its agents in the capital of Sana'a were the first to alert U.S., British and German intelligence about bombs on their way to the United States disguised as harmless United Parcel Service packages designed to detonate in midair. In case that failed, they were addressed to synagogues in the Chicago area, where they would detonate when opened.


  • Breakthrough or mirage?

    There may be something new under the sun after all. For the first time ever, the Arab League will send a delegation to the sovereign state it has tried to crush time and again. It must have finally dawned on the various Arab states, 22 in all, that the rising tide of terrorism in the region represents at least as great a danger to their always fragile governments as it does to Israel. And there's nothing like a common enemy to bring once-hostile nations together. Ideologies come and go; national interests remain.


  • Breakthrough or mirage?

    There may be something new under the sun after all. For the first time ever, the Arab League will send a delegation to the sovereign state it has tried to crush time and again. It must have finally dawned on the various Arab states, 22 in all, that the rising tide of terrorism in the region represents at least as great a danger to their always fragile governments as it does to Israel. And there's nothing like a common enemy to bring once-hostile nations together. Ideologies come and go; national interests remain.


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