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AIR FORCE - F-16 Fighting Falcon is a single-engine multirole fighter aircraft originally developed by General Dynamics for the United States Air Force (USAF). Designed as an air superiority day fighter, it evolved into a successful all-weather multirole aircraft. Over 4,500 aircraft have been built since production was approved in 1976. Although no longer being purchased by the U.S. Air Force, improved versions are still being built for export customers. In 1993, General Dynamics sold its aircraft manufacturing business to the Lockheed Corporation, which in turn became part of Lockheed Martin after a 1995 merger with Martin Marietta. The Fighting Falcon has key features including a frameless bubble canopy for better visibility, side-mounted control stick to ease control while maneuvering, a seat reclined 30 degrees to reduce the effect of g-forces on the pilot, and the first use of a relaxed static stability/fly-by-wire flight control system which helps to make it a nimble aircraft. The F-16 has an internal M61 Vulcan cannon and 11 locations for mounting weapons and other mission equipment. The F-16's official name is "Fighting Falcon", but "Viper" is commonly used by its pilots and crews, due to a perceived resemblance to aviper snake as well as the Battlestar Galactica Colonial Viper starfighter. In addition to active duty U.S. Air Force, Air Force Reserve Command, and Air National Guard units, the aircraft is also used by the USAF aerial demonstration team, the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, and as an adversary/aggressor aircraft by the United States Navy. The F-16 has also been procured to serve in the air forces of 25 other nations. As of 2015, it is the second most common currently operational military aircraft in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald)

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Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus attends an event at the General Dynamics NASSCO shipyard in National City, Calif., in this Jan. 9, 2014, file photo. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi, FIle)

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In this image provided by the U.S. Navy the Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer DDG 1000 is floated out of dry dock at the General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard Oct. 28, 2013. The ship that bears his name, the first of three Zumwalt-class destroyers, will be christened by Zumwalt's two daughters on Saturday April 12, 2014 at Bath Iron Works. Joining them will be his surviving son, who's a retired Marine, and other relatives.(AP Photo/U.S. Navy)

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In this image provided by the U.S. Navy the Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer DDG 1000 is floated out of dry dock at the General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard Oct. 28, 2013. The ship that bears his name, the first of three Zumwalt-class destroyers, will be christened by Zumwalt's two daughters on Saturday April 12, 2014 at Bath Iron Works. Joining them will be his surviving son, who's a retired Marine, and other relatives.(AP Photo/U.S. Navy)

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A view of the new USNS John Glenn that was christened Saturday Feb. 1, 2014, at General Dynamics NASSCO. (AP Photo/UT San Diego, Charlie Neuman) MANDATORY CREDIT

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John Glenn is applauded by high ranking Naval Officers shortly after his daughter Lyn Glenn smashed the ceremonial bottle of champagne on the side of the USNS John Glenn during its christening at General Dynamics NASSCO, Saturday Feb. 1, 2014, in San Diego, Calif. (AP Photo/UT San Diego, Charlie Neuman) MANDATORY CREDIT

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The 1,000-ton deckhouse of the future destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is craned toward the deck of the ship to be integrated with the ship's hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works. The ship launch and christening are planned in 2013. BATH , Maine (Dec. 14, 2012) (U.S. Navy photo)

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The 1,000-ton deckhouse of the future destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is craned toward the deck of the ship to be integrated with the ship's hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works. The ship launch and christening are planned in 2013. (U.S. Navy photo)

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Brent W. West, General Dynamics Bath Iron Works DDG 1000 Program Manager, delivers remarks during the keel laying ceremony for the Zumwalt-class destroyer DDG 1000. The Zumwalt-class is a new class of multi-mission U.S. Navy surface combatant ship designed to operate as part of a joint maritime fleet, assisting Marine strike forces ashore as well as performing littoral, air and sub-surface warfare. BATH, Maine (Nov. 17, 2011) U.S. Navy photo courtesy General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, Michael C. Nutter

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The 1,000-ton deckhouse of the future destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is craned toward the deck of the ship to be integrated with the ship's hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works. The ship launch and christening are planned in 2013. BATH , Maine (Dec. 14, 2012) (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

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U.S. NAVY/GENERAL DYNAMICS VIA GETTY IMAGES U S. Navy littoral combat ship began ocean trials July 2 in Mobile, Ala.