Topic - Google Inc.

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  • A look at the roadblocks facing driverless cars

    Google Inc. is pushing hard to bring cars driven by computers - not people - to market. To do so, the Silicon Valley giant persuaded states including California to pass laws explicitly legalizing the still-emerging technology. After all, a basic premise of driving is that a person controls the vehicle.

  • White and male, Google releases diversity data

    In a groundbreaking disclosure, Google revealed how very white and male its workforce is - just 2 percent of its Googlers are black, 3 percent are Hispanic, and 30 percent are women.

  • This image provided by Google shows an artistic rendering of the company's self-driving car. The two-seater won't be sold publicly, but Google on Tuesday, May 27, 2014 said it hopes by this time next year, 100 prototypes will be on public roads. (AP Photo/Google)

    Google in the car business

    GETTING STARTED

  • White and male, Google releases diversity data

    In a groundbreaking disclosure, Google revealed Wednesday how very white and male its workforce is - just 2 percent of its Googlers are black, 3 percent are Hispanic, and 30 percent are women.

  • Google, lawmakers to help businesses get online

    Google Inc. and two Connecticut lawmakers are helping businesses get a presence online.

  • Workers in tech case likely to get average of $4K

    Nearly 60,000 high-tech workers are likely to receive an average of $4,000 apiece in a settlement of a class-action lawsuit alleging Apple and Google conspired in an illegal cartel of Silicon Valley employers that secretly refused to recruit each other's engineers.

  • Google, Apple settle longstanding patent dispute

    Two of the world's largest technology giants have reached an agreement to settle all of their lawsuits against each other regarding smartphone patents.

  • FILE - In this Oct. 17, 2012, file photo, a man raises his hand during at Google offices in New York. People should have some say over the results that pop up when they conduct a search of their own name online, Europe's highest court said Tuesday, May 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    Google to release diversity data about workforce

    Google is planning to release statistics documenting the diversity of its workforce for the first time amid escalating pressure on the technology industry to hire more minorities and women.

  • FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013, file photo, Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears Google Glass in San Francisco. Google is once again selling its Internet-connected eyewear to anyone in the U.S. as the company fine tunes a device that has sparked intrigue and disdain for its potential to change the way people interact with technology. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

    Google resumes Glass sales in the US

    Google is once again selling its Internet-connected eyewear to anyone in the U.S. as the company fine-tunes a device that has sparked intrigue and disdain for its potential to change the way people interact with technology.

  • FILE - In this Oct. 17, 2012, file photo, a man raises his hand during at Google offices in New York. People should have some say over the results that pop up when they conduct a search of their own name online, Europe's highest court said Tuesday, May 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    European court: Google must yield on personal info

    Europe's highest court Tuesday gave people the means to scrub their reputations online, issuing a landmark ruling that experts say could force Google and other search engines to delete references to old debts, long-ago arrests and other unflattering episodes.

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, April 29, 2014, file photo, Samsung attorney David Nelson walks to a federal courthouse in San Jose, Calif. A California jury determined Friday, May 2, 2014, that Samsung infringed Apple smartphone patents and awarded $120 million damages. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

    Jury says Samsung infringed Apple patents

    A California jury awarded Apple $119 million - far less than it demanded - in a patent battle with Samsung over alleged copying of smart phone features, and the jury made the victory even smaller by finding that Apple illegally used one of Samsung's patents.

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, April 29, 2014, file photo, Samsung attorney David Nelson walks to a federal courthouse in San Jose, Calif. A California jury determined Friday, May 2, 2014, that Samsung infringed Apple smartphone patents and awarded $120 million damages. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

    Jury says Samsung infringed Apple patents

    A California jury awarded Apple $119 million - far less than it demanded - in a patent battle with Samsung over alleged copying of smart phone features, and the jury made the victory even smaller by finding that Apple illegally used one of Samsung's patents.

  • In this April 12, 2014 photo, Nay Aung, founder of Oway company poses in his office, Yangon, Myanmar. Nay Aung, a 34-year-old Stanford graduate and former business operations and strategy manager at Google Inc., is among a vanguard of overseas-trained professionals who have returned to Myanmar to find both opportunities and challenges. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

    Myanmar returnees bet on frontier economy's future

    Former Google executive Nay Aung was philosophic as a crisis brewed at the Yangon headquarters of his Oway online travel services company.

  • Google to stop mining student emails for ad ideas

    Google will stop looking for advertising ideas in the emails of students using a suite of the Internet company's free products tailored for schools.

  • This Wednesday, April 23, 2014 photo provided by Google shows the Google driverless car navigating along a street in Mountain View, Calif. The director of Google's self-driving car project wrote in a blog post Monday, April 28, that development of the technology has entered a new stage: trying to master driving on city streets. Many times more complex than freeways, which the cars can now reliably navigate, city streets represent a huge challenge. (AP Photo/Google)

    Google: Driverless cars are mastering city streets

    Google says that cars it is programming to drive themselves have started to master the navigation of city streets and the challenges they bring, from jaywalkers to weaving bicyclists - a critical milestone for any commercially available self-driving car technology.

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