Google - Bio, News, Photos - Washington Times
Skip to content

Google

Latest Stories

google_showcase_27534.jpg

google_showcase_27534.jpg

Google CEO Sundar Pichai talks about TensorFlow at the end of his keynote address of the Google I/O conference Wednesday, May 17, 2017, in Mountain View, Calif. Google provided the latest peek at the digital services and gadgets that it has assembled in the high-tech tussle to become an even more influential force in people's lives.(AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

tec--google_showcase_69358.jpg

tec--google_showcase_69358.jpg

This Wednesday, April 26, 2017, photo shows a Google icon on a mobile phone, in Philadelphia. Google is about to provide the latest peek at its digital services and gadgets as it seeks to become an even more influential force in people’s lives. The overview will come Wednesday, May 17, 2017, during Google’s annual conference for thousands of computer programmers. Updates to the next version of Google’s Android software for mobile devices and its voice-controlled digital assistant are among the items expected to be on the agenda. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

voice_assistants-hacking_09798.jpg

voice_assistants-hacking_09798.jpg

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016, file photo, Google Home, right, sits on display near a Pixel phone following a product event, in San Francisco. Voice assistants such as Google Home, Apple’s Siri and Amazon Alexa have always been susceptible to accidental hijack. Burger King’s manipulation of Google Home illustrates the vulnerabilities intrinsic to voice assistants that can be targeted by brands, or worse, hackers. But the stunt might help speed up the next developments for home voice assistants: individual voice recognition and even image recognition. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

google_docs_phishing_attack_19751.jpg

google_docs_phishing_attack_19751.jpg

FILE - This Oct. 20, 2015, file photo, shows a sign outside Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. Google is warning users Wednesday, May 3, 2017, to beware of a phishing scam spread by a fraudulent invitation to share a Google Doc. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

google-fighting_false_information_33102.jpg

google-fighting_false_information_33102.jpg

FILE - In this Tuesday, March 23, 2010, file photo, the Google logo is seen at the Google headquarters in Brussels. Google has sprinkled some new ingredients into its search engine in an effort to prevent bogus information and offensive suggestions from souring its results. Most of the changes announced Tuesday, April 25, 2017, are designed to reduce the chances that its influential search engine will highlight untrue stories about people and events, a phenomenon commonly referred to as “fake news.” Besides trying to block fake news, Google has reprogrammed a popular feature to omit derogatory search suggestions. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)

fiat_chrysler_google_97141.jpg

fiat_chrysler_google_97141.jpg

FILE - This Tuesday, May 6, 2014, file photo shows a sign outside Fiat Chrysler Automobiles world headquarters in Auburn Hills, Mich. Fiat Chrysler and Google said Tuesday, April 25, 2017, for the first time will offer rides to the public in the self-driving automobiles they are building under an expanding partnership. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)

google-more_personal_assistant_09798.jpg

google-more_personal_assistant_09798.jpg

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016, file photo, Google Home, right, sits on display near a Pixel phone following a product event, in San Francisco. Google’s voice-activated assistant can now recognize who’s talking to it on the Google’s Home speaker. An update coming out Thursday, April 20, 2017, will enable Home’s built-in assistant to learn the different voices of up to six people, although they can’t all be talking to the internet-connected speaker at the same time. The feature will allow Home to be more personal in some responses and give it a potential advantage over Amazon.com’s Echo. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

google_earth_revival_57824.jpg

google_earth_revival_57824.jpg

Kara Koch, producer with Sesame Workshop, demonstrates features on Google Earth, displayed in background, Tuesday, April 18, 2017, in New York. Google Earth is getting a revival, with the mapping service becoming more of a tool for adventure and exploration. Google has partnered with such groups as the BBC, NASA and the producers of "Sesame Street" to mix in video clips, photos and text narratives. (AP Photo/Anick Jesdanun)

google_earth_revival_04704.jpg

google_earth_revival_04704.jpg

Lilian Pintea, chief scientist with the Jane Goodall Institute, demonstrates features on Google Earth, Tuesday, April 18, 2017, in New York. Google Earth is getting a revival, with the mapping service becoming more of a tool for adventure and exploration. Google has partnered with such groups as the BBC, NASA and the producers of "Sesame Street" to mix in video clips, photos and text narratives. The Jane Goodall Institute, for instance, lets you journey to spots in Tanzania that inspired the chimpanzee expert. (AP Photo/Anick Jesdanun)

AP_543347366592

AP_543347366592

8. Larry Page, 44, computer scientist and Internet entrepreneur who co-founded Google with Sergey Brin. Page is the chief executive officer (CEO) of Google's parent company, Alphabet Inc. After stepping aside as Google CEO in August 2001 in favour of Eric Schmidt, he re-assumed the role in April 2011. He announced his intention to step aside a second time in July 2015 to become CEO of Alphabet, under which Google's assets would be reorganized. Under Page, Alphabet is seeking to deliver major advancements in a variety of industries. Page is the inventor of PageRank, Google's best-known search ranking algorithm. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

google_maps-location_sharing_20171.jpg

google_maps-location_sharing_20171.jpg

This Wednesday, March 22, 2017, photo shows the Google Maps app on a smartphone, in New York. Google is enabling users of its digital mapping service to allow their movements to be tracked by friends and family in the latest test of how much privacy people are willing to sacrifice in an era of rampant sharing. The location-monitoring feature will begin rolling out Wednesday in an update to the Google Maps mobile app that’s already on most of the world’s smartphones. It will also be available on personal computers. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)

google_maps-location_sharing_50115.jpg

google_maps-location_sharing_50115.jpg

FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2015, file photo, a man walks past a building on the Google campus in Mountain View, Calif. Google is enabling users of its digital mapping service to allow their movements to be tracked by friends and family in the latest test of how much privacy people are willing to sacrifice in an era of rampant sharing. The location-monitoring feature will begin rolling out Wednesday, March 22, 2017, in an update to the Google Maps mobile app that’s already on most of the world’s smartphones. It will also be available on personal computers. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

google-mobile_shortcuts_56672.jpg

google-mobile_shortcuts_56672.jpg

This image provided by Google shows a screen grab of a smartphone demonstrating the use of a new search feature by Google called Shortcuts. Shortcuts are a new row of icons that appear below the Google search box that can be tapped so people can see the latest weather in the area, movie times, suggestions on places to eat or scores of their latest teams without typing anything into the search box. (Google via AP)

google_rural_school_bus_wifi_90875.jpg

google_rural_school_bus_wifi_90875.jpg

St. Stephen Middle School student Lakaysha Governor works on her Chromebook on Monday, March 20, 2017, on a school bus recently outfitted with WiFi by tech giant Google, as College of Charleston professor RoxAnn Stalvey looks on in St. Stephen, S.C. Lakysha is one of nearly 2,000 students in South Carolina's rural Berkeley County benefiting from a grant from Google, which on Monday unveiled one of its WiFi-equipped school buses in the area. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard)

google-search_accuracy_80009.jpg

google-search_accuracy_80009.jpg

FILE - This March 23, 2010, file photo, shows the Google logo at the Google headquarters in Brussels. Google is now letting its human "quality raters" flag content that is "upsetting" or "offensive" in search results. The quality raters can flag such content, and while this does not directly affect the search results themselves, it serves to teach the company’s algorithms to surface better results when users search for something. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)

self-driving_cars_california_25840.jpg

self-driving_cars_california_25840.jpg

FILE - In this May 13, 2015, file photo, Google's new self-driving prototype car is introduced at the Google campus in Mountain View, Calif. Cars with no steering wheel, no pedals and nobody at all inside could be driving themselves on California roads by the end of 2017, under proposed new rules that would give a powerful boost to the technology from the nation's most populous state. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar, File)

youtube_streaming_tv_24438.jpg

youtube_streaming_tv_24438.jpg

Chief Business Officer Robert Kuncl, with a graphic showing the many networks that will be carried, speaks during the introduction of YouTube TV at YouTube Space LA in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. People fed up with paying for cable the traditional way will soon be able to subscribe to it from YouTube. The Google-owned site known for cat videos and do-it-yourself makeup tutorials is the latest company to offer a version of cable that looks and feels more like Netflix. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

youtube_streaming_tv_84519.jpg

youtube_streaming_tv_84519.jpg

Christian Oestlien, director of product management at YouTube, speaks during the introduction of YouTube TV at YouTube Space LA in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. People fed up with paying for cable the traditional way will soon be able to subscribe to it from YouTube. The Google-owned site known for cat videos and do-it-yourself makeup tutorials is the latest company to offer a version of cable that looks and feels more like Netflix. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

youtube_streaming_tv_71241.jpg

youtube_streaming_tv_71241.jpg

YouTube Chief Product Officer Neal Mahan speaks during the introduction of YouTube TV at YouTube Space LA in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. People fed up with paying for cable the traditional way will soon be able to subscribe to it from YouTube. The Google-owned site known for cat videos and do-it-yourself makeup tutorials is the latest company to offer a version of cable that looks and feels more like Netflix. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

aptopix_youtube_streaming_tv_72243.jpg

aptopix_youtube_streaming_tv_72243.jpg

YouTube CEO Susan Wojicki speaks during the introduction of YouTube TV at YouTube Space LA in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. People fed up with paying for cable the traditional way will soon be able to subscribe to it from YouTube. The Google-owned site known for cat videos and do-it-yourself makeup tutorials is the latest company to offer a version of cable that looks and feels more like Netflix. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)