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The new Google Glass "Bold" prescription frames in "shale" color rests on a table at the Google Glass Basecamp space at Chelsea Market, Friday, Jan. 24, 2014, in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo) ** FILE **

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People attend a workshop called “New York Get Your Business Online” at Google offices in the city. (Associated Press)

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Google program manager Crystal Sholts speaks in favor of employee shuttles Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, before the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Authority board of directors at a SFMTA meeting at City Hall in San Francisco. San Francisco officials voted in favor of a proposal to start regulating employee shuttles for companies like Google, Facebook and Apple, charging a fee for those that use public bus stops and controlling where they load and unload. Private shuttle buses have created traffic problems, blocking public bus stops during peak commute hours. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

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FILE - Cecilia Abadie wears her Google Glass as she talks with her attorney outside of traffic court in this Dec. 3, 2013 file photo taken in San Diego. The California woman believed to be the first cited for wearing Google's computer-in-an-eyeglass while driving says she was within her rights and violated no law. The case to be tried Thursday Jan. 16, 2014 in a San Diego traffic court could help shape future laws on wearable technology as it goes mainstream. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi, File)

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Cecilia Abadie, left, wears a Google Glass computer-in-eyeglass device while her attorney, William Concidine, speaks to the media, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 in San Diego. A San Diego traffic court threw out a citation Thursday against Abadie, a woman believed to be the first motorist in the country ticketed for driving while wearing a Google Glass computer-in-eyeglass device. (AP Photo/U-T San Diego, John Gastaldo) NO SALES; COMMERCIAL INTERNET OUT

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In this photo from Jan. 15, 2014, Brian Otis, Google X project lead, speaks about a contact lens Google is testing to explore tear glucose in Mountain View, Calif. The contact lens is designed to monitor glucose levels in tears, a potential reprieve for millions of diabetics who have to draw their own blood as many as 10 times a day. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

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In this photo from Jan. 15, 2014, Brian Otis, Google X project lead, holds a contact lens Google is testing to explore tear glucose in Mountain View, Calif. The prototype, which Google says will take at least five years to reach consumers, is one of several medical devices being designed by companies to make glucose monitoring for diabetic patients more convenient and less invasive to their bodies than traditional finger pricks to draw blood. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

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In this photo from Jan. 15, 2014, Brian Otis, Google X project lead, holds a contact lens Google is testing to explore tear glucose in Mountain View, Calif. After years of scalding soldering hair-thin wires to miniaturize electronics, Otis has burned his fingertips so often that he can no longer feel the tiny chips he made from scratch in Google’s Silicon Valley headquarters, a small price to pay for what he says is the smallest wireless glucose sensor that has ever been made. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)