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In this March 1, 2017, photo, Marta Guembes, Guatemala's honorary consul in Portland, Ore., talks about how she has been trying to help Guatemalan immigrants who were detained in the predominantly Latino town, during an interview in Woodburn, Ore. Speaking outside the offices of PCUN, a union representing farmworkers, nursery and reforestation workers in Oregon, Guembes says such detentions cause enormous pain for families in Woodburn and in Guatemala that receive money from relatives working in the U.S. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky)

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In this photograph taken Dec. 6, 2016, Temple I, also known as Temple of the Great Jaguar, is seen during a sunny day in northern Guatemala's Tikal National Park. The sprawling park in northern Guatemala is one of the country's top travel attractions, showcasing the Mayan civilization's engineering feats. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)

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Miss Universe contestant Kimberly Castillo, of the Dominican Republic, dances as Alejandra Argudo, of Ecuador, center, and Ana Montufar Urrutia, of Guatemala, watch after a news conference for contestants from Latin America and Spain, Monday, Jan. 12, 2015, in Doral, Fla. The Miss Universe pageant will be held on Jan. 25, in Miami. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

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United States' Alex Morgan is checked by a team trainer during the first half of a CONCACAF Women's Championship soccer game against Guatemala on Friday, Oct. 17, 2014, in Bridgeview, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

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Sheba Velasco, a Mayan interpreter (the Ixil language, which has about 70,000 speakers in Guatemala) who's seen her business grow with the surge of illegal immigrants from Central America., Alexandria, Va., Friday, August 22, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Sheba Velasco, a Mayan interpreter (the Ixil language, which has about 70,000 speakers in Guatemala) who's seen her business grow with the surge of illegal immigrants from Central America., Alexandria, Va., Friday, August 22, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Sheba Velasco, a Mayan interpreter (the Ixil language, which has about 70,000 speakers in Guatemala) who's seen her business grow with the surge of illegal immigrants from Central America., Alexandria, Va., Friday, August 22, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Sheba Velasco, a Mayan interpreter (the Ixil language, which has about 70,000 speakers in Guatemala) who's seen her business grow with the surge of illegal immigrants from Central America., Alexandria, Va., Friday, August 22, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Sheba Velasco, a Mayan interpreter (the Ixil language, which has about 70,000 speakers in Guatemala) who's seen her business grow with the surge of illegal immigrants from Central America., Alexandria, Va., Friday, August 22, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Sheba Velasco, a Mayan interpreter (the Ixil language, which has about 70,000 speakers in Guatemala) who's seen her business grow with the surge of illegal immigrants from Central America., Alexandria, Va., Friday, August 22, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Sheba Velasco, a Mayan interpreter (the Ixil language, which has about 70,000 speakers in Guatemala) who's seen her business grow with the surge of illegal immigrants from Central America., Alexandria, Va., Friday, August 22, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Sheba Velasco, a Mayan interpreter (the Ixil language, which has about 70,000 speakers in Guatemala) who's seen her business grow with the surge of illegal immigrants from Central America., Alexandria, Va., Friday, August 22, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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**FILE** President Obama speaks to the media while meeting with El Salvador's President Salvador Sanchez Ceren, Guatemala's President Otto Perez Molina, and Honduran President Juan Hernandez, to discuss Central American immigration and the border crisis in the Cabinet Room in Washington on July 25, 2014. (Associated Press)

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U.S. President Barack Obama speaks to the media, while meeting with El Salvador's President Salvador Sanchez Ceren, Guatemala's President Otto Perez Molina, and Honduran President Juan Hernandez, to discuss Central American immigration and the border crisis in the Cabinet Room of the White House Friday, July 25, 2014, in Washington. (AP Photo)

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Guatemala's President Otto Perez Molina, left, and Honduran President Juan Hernandez, right, listen as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks to the media, after they met to discuss Central American immigration and the border crisis in the Cabinet Room of the White House Friday, July 25, 2014, in Washington. (AP Photo)