Health_Medical_Pharma

Latest Health_Medical_Pharma Items
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    Baltimore Orioles pitcher Ubaldo Jimenez pauses in the sixth inning of a baseball game against Toronto Blue Jays, Sunday, April 13, 2014, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)


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    Baltimore Orioles' Delmon Young follows through on a double against the Toronto Blue Jays in the first inning of a baseball game on Sunday, April 13, 2014, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)



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    Sarah Luke, 73, of Kennesaw, Ga., watches a television health show while walking on a treadmill at her local YMCA, Friday, April 4, 2014, in Kennesaw, Ga. With many consumers getting health insurance for the first time through the federal marketplace, insurers are finding creative ways to treat one of the most common diseases they're encountering, diabetes. Insurers are trying to quickly pinpoint new enrollees with diabetes and connect them with a doctor, diet plan and other disease management services. Before the Affordable Care Act, insurers could reject people with pre-existing conditions. But now insurers are required to take all comers and can't charge them extra, companies know that keeping consumers healthy will cost them less in the long run. (AP Photo/David Goldman)


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    Sarah Luke, 73, of Kennesaw, Ga., who was diagnosed with diabetes six years ago, walks on a treadmill as part of a new exercise program at her local YMCA, Friday, April 4, 2014, in Kennesaw, Ga. With many consumers getting health insurance for the first time through the federal marketplace, insurers are finding creative ways to treat one of the most common diseases they're encountering, diabetes. Insurers are trying to quickly pinpoint new enrollees with diabetes and connect them with a doctor, diet plan and other disease management services. Before the Affordable Care Act, insurers could reject people with pre-existing conditions. But now insurers are required to take all comers and can't charge them extra, companies know that keeping consumers healthy will cost them less in the long run. (AP Photo/David Goldman)


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    Sarah Luke, 73, of Kennesaw, Ga., who was diagnosed with diabetes six years ago, poses for a portrait before a workout at her local YMCA, Friday, April 4, 2014, in Kennesaw, Ga. With many consumers getting health insurance for the first time through the federal marketplace, insurers are finding creative ways to treat one of the most common diseases they're encountering, diabetes. Insurers are trying to quickly pinpoint new enrollees with diabetes and connect them with a doctor, diet plan and other disease management services. Before the Affordable Care Act, insurers could reject people with pre-existing conditions. But now insurers are required to take all comers and can't charge them extra, companies know that keeping consumers healthy will cost them less in the long run. (AP Photo/David Goldman)


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    2a3f82cf84f2420e510f6a7067005b9c.jpg

    Sarah Luke, 73, of Kennesaw, Ga., who was diagnosed with diabetes six years ago, poses for a portrait before a workout at her local YMCA, Friday, April 4, 2014, in Kennesaw, Ga. With many consumers getting health insurance for the first time through the federal marketplace, insurers are finding creative ways to treat one of the most common diseases they're encountering, diabetes. Insurers are trying to quickly pinpoint new enrollees with diabetes and connect them with a doctor, diet plan and other disease management services. Before the Affordable Care Act, insurers could reject people with pre-existing conditions. But now insurers are required to take all comers and can't charge them extra, companies know that keeping consumers healthy will cost them less in the long run. (AP Photo/David Goldman)




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