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This photo taken Nov. 25, 2013 shows microbiologist Ashley Sabol extracting Listeria bacteria for genome sequencing in a foodborne disease outbreak lab at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. The nation's disease detectives are beginning a program to try to outsmart outbreaks by routinely decoding the DNA of deadly bacteria and viruses. The initial target: Listeria, a kind of bacteria that's the third-leading cause of death from food poisoning, and one that's especially dangerous to pregnant women. Already, the technology has helped to solve a small listeria outbreak that killed one person in California and sickened seven others in Maryland. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

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This photo taken Nov. 25, 2013 shows microbiologist Heather Carleton pulling up results of Listeria bacteria DNA while demonstrating a whole-genome sequencing machine called a MiSeq in a foodborne disease outbreak lab at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. The nation's disease detectives are beginning a program to try to outsmart outbreaks by routinely decoding the DNA of deadly bacteria and viruses. The initial target: Listeria, a kind of bacteria that's the third-leading cause of death from food poisoning, and one that's especially dangerous to pregnant women. Already, the technology has helped to solve a small listeria outbreak that killed one person in California and sickened seven others in Maryland.(AP Photo/David Goldman)

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This photo taken Nov. 25, 2013 shows microbiologist Dr. Molly Freeman pulling Listeria bacteria from a tube to be tested for its DNA fingerprinting in a foodborne disease outbreak lab at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. The nation's disease detectives are beginning a program to try to outsmart outbreaks by routinely decoding the DNA of deadly bacteria and viruses. The initial target: Listeria, a kind of bacteria that's the third-leading cause of death from food poisoning, and one that's especially dangerous to pregnant women. Already, the technology has helped to solve a small listeria outbreak that killed one person in California and sickened seven others in Maryland.(AP Photo/David Goldman)

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Arizona Diamondbacks starting pitcher Brandon McCarthy throws in the first inning of a baseball game against the Colorado Rockies on Saturday, April 5, 2014, in Denver. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

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Colorado Rockies starting pitcher Jorge De La Rosa throws in the first inning of a baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks on Saturday, April 5, 2014, in Denver. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

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Arizona Diamondbacks Paul Goldschmidt slides safely into home base on a hit by Martin Prado in the first inning of a baseball game against the Colorado Rockies on Saturday, April 5, 2014, in Denver. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)

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Colorado Rockies Michael Cuddyer celebrates a two-run home run in the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks on Saturday, April 5, 2014, in Denver. (AP Photo/Chris Schneider)