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President Ronald Reagan appeared hip in the sense that he was of good cheer, canny and young at heart, minus annoying attitude. (THE WASHINGTON TIMES)

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Joe Herbert, left, Emeritus Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge and Barbara Sahakian, right, professor of Clinical Neurophychology at the same university, pose prior to a news conference to announce the results of a new study in central London, Monday, Feb. 17, 2014. A saliva test for teenage boys with mild symptoms of depression could help predict those who will later develop major depression, the new study says. Researchers who measured cortisol levels in teenagers found that boys with high levels of the hormone and mild depression symptoms were 14 times more likely to later suffer from clinical depression than those with low levels. Herbert said: "You don’t have to rely simply on what the patient tells you, but what you can measure inside the patient," comparing the new test to those done for other health problems, like heart disease, which evaluate things like cholesterol and high blood sugar to determine a patient’s risk. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

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Joe Herbert, left, Emeritus Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge poses for the photographer prior to a news conference to announce the results of a new study in central London, Monday, Feb. 17, 2014. A saliva test for teenage boys with mild symptoms of depression could help predict those who will later develop major depression, the new study says. Researchers who measured cortisol levels in teenagers found that boys with high levels of the hormone and mild depression symptoms were 14 times more likely to later suffer from clinical depression than those with low levels. Herbert said: "You don’t have to rely simply on what the patient tells you, but what you can measure inside the patient," comparing the new test to those done for other health problems, like heart disease, which evaluate things like cholesterol and high blood sugar to determine a patient’s risk. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

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Joe Herbert, right, Emeritus Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge and Barbara Sahakian, left, professor of Clinical Neurophychology at the same university, pose for the photographer prior to a news conference to announce the results of a new study in central London, Monday, Feb. 17, 2014. A saliva test for teenage boys with mild symptoms of depression could help predict those who will later develop major depression, the new study says. Researchers who measured cortisol levels in teenagers found that boys with high levels of the hormone and mild depression symptoms were 14 times more likely to later suffer from clinical depression than those with low levels. Herbert said: "You don’t have to rely simply on what the patient tells you, but what you can measure inside the patient," comparing the new test to those done for other health problems, like heart disease, which evaluate things like cholesterol and high blood sugar to determine a patient’s risk. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

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FILE - This June 6, 2013 file photo shows the sign outside the National Security Agency (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. Compared with their more moderate Republican or Democratic peers, tea party supporters and liberals are significantly more likely to oppose the collection of millions of ordinary citizens’ telephone and Internet data, an Associated Press-GfK poll shows. By a 2-to-1 margin, both tea party supporters and liberals say the government should put protecting citizens’ rights and freedoms ahead of protecting them from terrorists. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

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In this Feb. 3, 2014 photo, Maureen Grey poses for a photo in Chicago. For many older Americans who lost jobs during the recession, the quest for health care has been one obstacle after another. Grey, a 58-year-old Chicagoan, finally saw a doctor this month after a fall in September left her in constant pain. Laid off twice from full-time jobs in the past five years, she saw her income drop from $60,000 to $17,800 a year. Now doing temp work, she was uninsured for 18 months before she chose a marketplace plan for $68 a month. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

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This photo provided by the California National Primate Research Center shows a nursing rhesus macaque monkey in 2013. In a study of hundreds of milk samples, researcher Katie Hinde of Harvard University found that nursing rhesus macaque monkeys made different milk for daughters versus sons. Scientific insights to mother’s milk might someday help doctors provide better advice to nursing mothers, or suggest ways to improve infant formula. The studies raise questions for human babies, too, about how to choose the donor milk that's used for hospitalized preemies, or whether to explore gender-specific infant formula. (AP Photo/California National Primate Research Center, Kathy West)

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This undated handout photo provided by the University of South Florida College of Medicine shows Dr. Francisco Fernandez, who was named the founding dean of the new School of Medicine at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley on Friday, Feb. 14, 2014. (AP Photo/University of South Florida College of Medicine)

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Army Chief of Staff Ray Odierno testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington on April 23, 2013. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

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In this Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014 photo, a slice of prototype pizza, in development to be used in MRE's — meals ready to eat, sits in a packet next to a smaller packet known as an oxygen scavenger, left, at the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center, Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014, in Natick, Mass. Pizza is in development to be used in individual field rations known as meal ready to eat, or MREs. It has been one of the most requested options for soldiers craving a slice of normalcy in the battlefield and disaster areas. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)