Health_Medical_Pharma

Latest Health_Medical_Pharma Items
  • Coffee drinkers received some good news from a new study. They are a little more likely to live longer. Compared to those who drank no coffee, men who had two or three cups a day were 10 percent less likely to die at any age. For women, it was 13 percent. (Associated Press)

    Coffee linked to longer life

    One of life's simple pleasures just got a little sweeter. After years of waffling research on coffee and health, even some fear that java might raise the risk of heart disease, a big study finds the opposite: Coffee drinkers — regular or decaf — are a little more likely to live longer.


  • Pour it on: Study ties coffee to longer life

    Coffee seems to be good for you. Or at least it's not bad, say researchers who led the largest-ever study of coffee and health.


  • Coffee buzz: Study finds java drinkers live longer

    One of life's simple pleasures just got a little sweeter. After years of waffling research on coffee and health, even some fear that java might raise the risk of heart disease, a big study finds the opposite: Coffee drinkers are a little more likely to live longer. Regular or decaf doesn't matter.


  • Study: US clears drugs faster than Europe, Canada

    Researchers say the U.S. approved more new medicines in less time than Europe and Canada in the last decade, challenging long-standing criticisms that the Food and Drug Administration lags behind its peers in clearing important new drugs.


  • No tears as Ga. woman sees bacteria-ravaged hands

    A Georgia graduate student fighting a rare flesh-eating infection has been looking at her ravaged hands and asking about the damage, all without tears, her father said Wednesday.


  • Antibiotic linked with rare but deadly heart risk

    An antibiotic widely used for bronchitis and other common infections seems to increase chances for sudden deadly heart problems, a rare but surprising risk found in a 14-year study.


  • Study could end ban on gay men donating blood

    The federal government has one study in a planning stage and three studies under way that could eventually provide evidence to end the ban on blood donations from all gay men, a federal official said Wednesday.


  • UN: High blood pressure, glucose a global problem

    A quarter of those 25 or older now have high blood pressure worldwide, and almost one in 10 has worrying levels of glucose in their blood.


  • Alzheimer's plan goals: slow threat, help families

    Alzheimer's disease is a growing threat as the population gets older. Already, more than 5 million Americans have the mind-destroying disease. Barring some research breakthroughs, up to 16 million may have it by 2050. The first National Alzheimer's Plan, adopted Tuesday, aims to slow that threat _ and to help the families already suffering along the way.


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