Health_Medical_Pharma

Latest Health_Medical_Pharma Items
  • AIDS conference opens in Rome

    The head of the United Nations AIDS program called Sunday for an increase in access to drugs that help treat or prevent the spread of the disease, saying it is "morally wrong" to keep millions of people off lifesaving medication.


  • Simple eye test may give clues to Alzheimer's

    Australian scientists are reporting encouraging early results from an eye test they hope will create a simple way to detect signs of Alzheimer's disease.


  • 3 die at UK hospital where saline was contaminated

    British police are investigating whether three hospital patients died as a result of receiving saline solution contaminated with insulin.


  • Panel says ex-WSJ publisher not tied to scandal

    The independent committee charged with monitoring editorial integrity at The Wall Street Journal says it has found no evidence of phone-hacking or other wrongdoing at the Journal or Dow Jones.


  • Philippines warns against geckos as AIDS treatment

    The Philippines warned Friday against using geckos to treat AIDS and impotence, saying the folkloric practice in parts of Asia may put patients at risk.


  • 1st patient with man-made windpipe almost said no

    The first person to receive an artificial windpipe says he almost refused the lifesaving operation.


  • Puerto Rico Medicaid program buckles under debt

    Doctors in Puerto Rico are threatening to cut off service to nearly a million patients as a result of a standoff between the government and an insurance company over reimbursements for treating poor people.


  • Gov't agency vote to lower lead in toys

    The amount of lead allowed in toys and other children's products sold in the U.S. will soon be reduced to one of the lowest limits in the world. The move was praised by consumer advocates, but denounced by critics worried about job losses and shuttered businesses.


  • Gov't agency vote means lower lead in toys

    The amount of lead allowed in toys and other children's products sold in the U.S. will soon be reduced to one of the lowest limits in the world. The move was praised by consumer advocates but denounced by critics worried about job losses and shuttered businesses.


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